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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all. I am new here. Basically, had trouble finding the info I wanted. I am a doubler who is aiming to do grade 8 Abrsm in June.

My oboe has a crack, and we don't have storesd near me

So my question is the fox oboes (particularly the 330 or 300)

How do they compare tone wise to the other brands. Would I be frustrated going from a wooden (Tom sparkes oboe) to one of these.

Would I be better to stick with wood? Even though I want the durability of resin?

Do the smaller holes block more easier than on wood?

At the resin ones heavier than the grenadilla ones? Or lighter?

And do the fox oboes work well with a European scrape?

And is the tone a darker tone on these oboes, or a more bright one.

Thanks in advance
:)
 

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Hi all. I am new here. Basically, had trouble finding the info I wanted. I am a doubler who is aiming to do grade 8 Abrsm in June.

My oboe has a crack, and we don't have storesd near me

So my question is the fox oboes (particularly the 330 or 300)

How do they compare tone wise to the other brands. Would I be frustrated going from a wooden (Tom sparkes oboe) to one of these.

Would I be better to stick with wood? Even though I want the durability of resin?

Do the smaller holes block more easier than on wood?

At the resin ones heavier than the grenadilla ones? Or lighter?

And do the fox oboes work well with a European scrape?

And is the tone a darker tone on these oboes, or a more bright one.

Thanks in advance
:)
I'm surprised no one has else chimed in, lots of Fox oboe lovers on this board.
Disclaimer---- I haven't played oboe in 10 years (used to play a Rigoutat) although I'm considering getting back into the game.
Fox plastic oboes have a great reputation for sound, pitch stability and a very reliable mechanism. They're not very popular in Australia and I've never played one but I know many fine oboists who give them the thumbs up for a synthetic instrument.
Tom Sparkes oboes (which I've played), in my experience, are VERY resistant compared to other brands.
A synthetic body will be lighter than wood and the Fox should work fine with a short scrape reed.
I think in term of overall tone, your reeds will have more of an impact than the oboe you're playing. And, the most important thing with oboe is that the thing seals properly. And I mean PROPERLY. Good oboe repair is almost an art unto itself and I've known many fine woodwind repairers who either struggle with oboe or outright refuse to work on anything other than student models.
All that said, what does your teacher say?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Lol.

My teacher is from Spain. His comment was he didn't know about fox oboes! But as long as I had full mechanism!

My clarinet is ebonite (ridenour) and is much heavier than my wooden buffet and wooden Amati.

Interesting what u say about Tom sparkes. My sisters is very free blowing, and mine was before the crack. Maybe we were both just lucky.

I played a Howarth xm I think (the top model... But I think they have a lighter weight one out now). And it was heavy, and much more resistant than my oboe. But then the tone was so beautifully dark on the Howarth.

I guess that is my fear. I want to enjoy playing.

I have had trouble googling reviews too... Not too many that I could find.. I guess oboe is a bit of an exclusive instrument :eek:

Thanks so much for your reply.
 

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My oboe playing daughter prefered the Bulgheroni over the Fox oboes.
Better sound, less resistance, and more oboe for the same price.
She uses European and American scrape reeds with no problems.
 

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So here are my thoughts on the oboe and brands.

Fox oboes have a great reputation for quality and consistency, especially the high end oboes. I know many symphony players who swear by the Yamaha oboes for back ups and for plastic oboes when they need something more stable and crack resistant than wood.

My recommendation, if you are able, is to find models that you can afford and try them. You will know when you find one worth your attention and money. The standard with any instrument, regardless, of make or model is how does the thing sound when I put some air through the thing and can I do the things I want to do with the make and model in my hands. Finding the perfect instrument for you takes some time. You are the unknown in any instrument. I will get a much different sound than you will.

Greenline instruments may give you the stability of resin with the warmth of wood.

Get out and try some instruments. Your questions here will give you some information about the instruments, but only your playing them will give you the true answers to your questions.

Happy hunting.
 

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I recommend Fox oboes to all my students, and own one myself, in addition to two Lorees. I don't think you can beat a Fox for great intonation, focused sound and durability. Fox oboes are sensational, and you don't ever have to worry about cracking one, something you can't say for wooden instruments!
 

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I tried a Fox wooden oboe a few years ago and was not impressed by its tone. No top oboist (that I am aware of) plays Fox oboes.
Not to declare myself to be a top player, but I play a Fox Sayen oboe, as do Pedro Diaz from the Met Opera Orchestra and Liz Koch Tiscione from the Atlanta Symphony, among others. I'm happy to answer any questions anyone has.

Aaron Hill
 

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I tried the Fox Sayen a few years ago. Fine oboe...good sound and intonation, but low resale value.

I find oboes to be very personal...so much of the tone and sound come from the instrument, I suggest trying and comparing before buying as three examples of the same model may sound and play differently. Unless you look be in Chicago or New York, you probably don’t live near any stores so will have to have them shipped to you.

I recommend shawna at oboe Chicago or Jeff at Midwest musical imports. Both have websites with a good selection of new and used oboes and liberal trial policies.

I now play a Covey I’m very happy with, and have had love/hate relationships with Loree. Another brand to consider is MCW. A Bulgheroni manufacture, but assembled and fine tuned by Mark Chernow. Missing the c banana key, but otherwise, a great instrument in every respect (I play a Bulgheroni EH so am biased).
 
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