Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,042 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a Buescher True Tone curved soprano which took some damage to the neck at some point in its life. The repair work was well done and the horn plays fine but the neck was resoldered to the horn at a different position than stock (neck turned clockwise about 10 degrees as viewed from the top). This might well have been due to player preference. I personally prefer the stock straight back position for the neck on a curved soprano.

Given a very fast heat of the point where the neck inserts into the body ferrule can I reasonably expect to be able to melt the solder sufficiently to twist the neck about 10 degrees counter clockwise and then just let it cool and proclaim victory with no new solder, ETC? (The joint is full up with a relatively neat dose of clean solder from the original repair- a good fit without an excessive gap.) The joint on a curved soprano is pretty small and most of the heat would be on the lower neck and edge of the ferrule- very localized melting ought to be achievable.

Or is this liable to turn into a full fledged wire up this and that as bits and pieces slide off- leaving silver toned snail trails down the stack- and a reclean, reflux, reset the neck in the ferrule and reset the ferrule on the stack type of deal?

I'm trying to weigh the amount of likely PITA involved against the return in terms of neck angle. I am OK with soldering skills- good for posts and braces, "iffier" on larger jobs such as body to bow joints on a tenor (wound up squandering hours undoing the mess I made in terms of adjacent posts ganging aglee when last I did that back in the early nineties).
 

·
Forum Contributor 2007-2012, Distinguished SOTW Te
Joined
·
3,314 Posts
As I understand it, heating and re-flowing old solder is not as good of a joint as cleaning the joint and using new solder.

If you think of the distance the heat has to travel, its farther around the circumference of the joint than it is down to the closest post. Unless you use multiple torches you will have a post fall off before you get the whole circular joint of the tenon heated. Getting circular joints unsoldered is much more finicky a process than (re)soldering them once cleaned because the whole joint has to be hot enough all at once for solder to flow.

You could probably do it using two torches and some kool jool or something similar, but there are a lot of variables involved. It would be a gamble, with the potential downside being what you mentioned.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,042 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks- I figure I'll just live with it. If nothing else I'd wind up burning the crap out of my fingers at some point for sure!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
Joined
·
7,107 Posts
I once owned a 1930 Conn curvy with the neck similarly reangled. You had to play it Prez fashion, with the bell closer in to the body.

Suppose your horn belonged to the same player as mine?
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top