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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For me that is a live recording by Illinois Jacquet of "The King", coming from the LP "Illinois Jacquet – Genius At Work!".

Here is the solo (starts at 0:45, more than 4 minutes long):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15Ri5gsiFxM

Further info:

00:00 - A1 The King (Count Basie)
05:32 - A2 Easy Living (Leo Robin, Ralph Rainger)
10:06 - A3 C Jam Blues (Duke Ellington)
18:07 - B1 Take The A Train (Billy Strayhorn)
28:30 - B2 I Wanna Blow Now (Bennie Green)

Tenor Saxophone, Vocals – Illinois Jacquet
Organ – Milt Buckner
Drums – Tony Crombie

Side A recorded at the Ronnie Scott Club, London, April 14, 1971
Side B recorded at the Ronnie Scott Club, London, April 13, 1971

He plays another great solo in "Take The A Train", don't forget to check that one out too. :)

About his solo in "The King":

His first recordings of that tune are from the mid 40's and as you can hear in the 1971 solo he stays close to the older version(s), but with (minor) changes each time. The 1947 YouTube version seems a bit too fast to me, I think the original (which I have on record, but my record player doesn't work anymore) is slower. Here are the links:

- 1946: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPoTZGOrHlU (solo just after 1:35)
- 1947: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ns5SOfVOFMU (solo just after 0:30)

I've always found from the fist time I heard that 1971 solo in "The King" (I bought that LP around 1980 at age 18) that it was one of the best tenor solo's ever (still think that, almost 40 years later!). As mentioned above Jacquet recorded it many times from 1946 onwards and I think it's his original solo, but hear a lot of quotes and licks in it that easily could have come from Lester Young and Herschel Evans. I've also heard Flip Phillips playing this solo during one of those lengthy Jazz At The Philharmonic battles of the late 40's (not sure which one) and have heard many other players quoting licks from this solo too (Willis Jackson, Scott Hamilton, others).

I'm curious of any of you knows more about the real sources of this great solo. Feel free to share what you know/find about that.
 

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10MFAN MOUTHPIECES "Innovation over imitation"
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Oh yes!
Endless great ideas and super energy. One of my favorite players, for sure! Thanks so much for posting this.
 

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SOTW Columnist/ Forum Contributor 2014, Disti
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:cheers::cheers::cheers: just love the old school tenor styles. Thanks for posting. I have several LP's with Mr. Jacquet. This "live" LP is excellent with the sax up in the mix where it belongs!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Glad you enjoyed it gentlemen :)

This "live" LP is excellent with the sax up in the mix where it belongs!
Yes John, and with Milt Buckner pulling out all registers the sax should be up in the mix for sure!

IJ had a natural big sound, which also helped a lot!
 

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05:32 - A2 Easy Living (Leo Robin, Ralph Rainger)
I admire solo in all the above mentioned songs, but I have to admit that I'm always impressed by the mood of Easy Living ...
I used to like Easy Living by Billie Holiday on my aunt's old record, with a clarinet solo, but the mood ...
Here - this is the mood ...
Classic Old Vox
Beautiful - mood and tear squeezer.
I love these night ballads, warmth and satin, beautifully emphasized by streams of harmony seeping from the organ, pensive and slightly regretting ... why so beautiful?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I admire solo in all the above mentioned songs, but I have to admit that I'm always impressed by the mood of Easy Living ...
I used to like Easy Living by Billie Holiday on my aunt's old record, with a clarinet solo, but the mood ...
Here - this is the mood ...
Classic Old Vox
Beautiful - mood and tear squeezer.
I love these night ballads, warmth and satin, beautifully emphasized by streams of harmony seeping from the organ, pensive and slightly regretting ... why so beautiful?
Jacquet was for sure a master of ballads too, besides playing rough swinging steaming Texas Tenor solo's.

Arnett Cobb was another master of that type of playing.
 
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