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Discussion Starter #1
"Hi ya'll!"

During my recent struggle with my "cops" (ref. joke for my typo :) ) / chops fatigue, the responses I got lead me to realize it was a reed situation (thank you all for your suggestions!). Moving from Legere back to cane turned out to be an issue (cane inconsistencies, etc, even with adjustments, which I don't completely suck at), had me jump over to my Berg SS 100/2/M for an hour, or so. My main piece is a LAW Buzzer 8, but the Berp was far easier to play, which is expected. What this has led me to is the desire to play a more closed piece, I don't want to work as hard. I was able to shed for hours at a time, but looking back, I was still putting in quite a bit of physical effort to deal with my setup that could have gone to other areas that I need to work on.

Acknowledging the givens; "go try some", "one person's holy grail, gets tossed into another person's 'lessons learned' drawer", etc, I'm still looking for suggestions / wisdom from the SotW hive mind. Here's what I'm looking for:

- Breakaway: looking for shallow-ish, but not too shallow.

- Tip opening: the Berp seems to register ~.0938, whereas the LAW measures ~.109. I'd like to lean in the direction of .0938, understanding that it may be slightly more / slightly less than that.

- Intonation: as I mention below, the LAW is so easy to play in tune, I'd like that to be a notable characteristic of my future piece. The Berp is all over the place, which I expect. The rails/inner walls on the Berp feel like little rolling hills, it certainly lives up to the Berg reputation for being 'not great' (expect for the great ones, from what I've heard).

- Sound: I love that I can get a range of tonal qualities from the LAW, from as dark as I want, to as bright as I want, and an easy sub-tone. It accepts any reed I've thrown at it, overtones don't falter unless I do, its altissimo is as good as I can play it (the mouthpiece doesn't lack - as I work to extend my range, it provides a platform for nice, full upper register notes once I've earned them; if I can barely get a note out, it's not because of the mpc, it's me).

- Facing curve: this one I need to do some more research on. Please excuse how dumb I'm about to sound, but: the curve on the LAW appears to be a little bit 'steeper' than the Berp. I have to do some reeding and learn how that impacts things. What little I knew, I've forgotten completely. I'm open to suggestions / schooling on this.

- QA/QC: I'd like something that I can confidently buy 'off the rack', new or used (ideally used, it's a budget thing). This is what has led me to this list of makers /pieces I'm currently looking into:

Jody Jazz DV NY / DV - not so sure about these. The sizing is spaced out a bit too much for me to know which to get without getting something too big/small. Expensive, even used.

Sakshama G - I've heard nothing but great things about his work, but I can't find anything used.

Theo Wanne - just starting this research, but they're really expensive, even used.

The few things I do find used are more open than I'd like.

** my LAW is a killin' piece. I took for granted how easy it is to play in tune, the full sound, etc. I really love this thing, but even with lighter reeds, I believe the breakaway, and probably other factors are causing me to work harder than I need to.

Oh, last thing. I may not play my LAW for a while if I get a new piece, but I'm not selling it. It would be one of those, "I wish I still had it" pieces.

Thank you for any suggestions or jokes you may have to lay on me!
 

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10mfan metal. You can find them used sometimes but Mark has some new ones coming out soon. Nothing plays easier.
 

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I have a Sakshama Florida virtually new that I’d consider selling. I bought it as a backup to my original Link Florida a couple years ago. Only played it once or twice. It really plays very very similar to my Link Florida. If interested, send me a PM.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have a Sakshama Florida virtually new that I’d consider selling. I bought it as a backup to my original Link Florida. Only played it once or twice. It really plays very very similar to my Link Florida. If interested, send me a PM.
I'm curious about it in relation to what I'm looking for; tip opening, facing curve, how deep is the breakaway, etc?

I'm replying here to get others input about those, pieces, but I'll also PM you.

Thank you for your response!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
10mfan metal. You can find them used sometimes but Mark has some new ones coming out soon. Nothing plays easier.
I've owned one of his pieces, and it was a great piece. I'll take another look at what he has.

Thanks for replying!
 

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Tip opening on mine is 0.100. I don’t know about the other measurements. You may want to ask Sakshama directly.
 

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I would definitely consider a Philtone Tribute. Lots of information on these online, but suffice to say they are one of the better Florida link style pieces out there, IMO, and they do come available used in the Marketplace from time to time.
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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If a facing looks 'steeper' than another, and the tip openings are similar, it must be because the facing is shorter, requiring a 'steeper' curve.
This whole thing sounds to me like you need to focus on the 'LAW', whatever that is, since you like it and its reed-friendly. Your problem is you do not have a well-developed embouchure and you're looking for a mouthpiece to do your work for you. This doesn't mean that a mouthpiece needs to be hard to play, it means that if you have a good mouthpiece it should be capable of doing what you want but you must be able to input what it takes to make the piece play up to its capacity. Basically you are playing two very different pieces, a 110 and a 95 with different interior designs. A .110 is not a 'large' tip for tenor but you would expect it to be harder to play than the .095 with the same reed, so you need to find the reed for that particular piece rather than looking for mouthpieces. I'd guess probably a #2 Rico Royal or 2 1/2 Rico. BTW, what is a 'breakaway'?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If a facing looks 'steeper' than another, and the tip openings are similar, it must be because the facing is shorter, requiring a 'steeper' curve.
This whole thing sounds to me like you need to focus on the 'LAW', whatever that is, since you like it and its reed-friendly. Your problem is you do not have a well-developed embouchure and you're looking for a mouthpiece to do your work for you. This doesn't mean that a mouthpiece needs to be hard to play, it means that if you have a good mouthpiece it should be capable of doing what you want but you must be able to input what it takes to make the piece play up to its capacity. Basically you are playing two very different pieces, a 110 and a 95 with different interior designs. A .110 is not a 'large' tip for tenor but you would expect it to be harder to play than the .095 with the same reed, so you need to find the reed for that particular piece rather than looking for mouthpieces. I'd guess probably a #2 Rico Royal or 2 1/2 Rico. BTW, what is a 'breakaway'?
These are good suggestions, thank you. I'll fill in a little more data, if you'll indulge me.

I apologize for the vernacular goof, it's been many years since I've had the parts of the mouthpiece loaded into my mind, haven't needed 'em. I meant the 'break'; reed breaking away from the rails, iirc. I prefer less mpc in my mouth (having more mpc in than is natural for me requires more work to keep everything in line (intonation, dynamics, air-stream gets messed with, etc), it seems to be unnecessary work, not that 'good' work), but I also prefer to not squelch the reed by drawing back too much (bottom lip relaxed, but still), unless the timbre I want necessitates an adjustment in relation to the break. Of course, that's not the only way I adjust timbre; tongue position, airspeed, targeting specific overtones, etc. The usual. I know you know that, I'm giving data in the interest of being thorough.

I agree, my embouchure needs work, it's a daily thing. Even so, before I changed back to cane and was using the Legere Sig #3, I didn't run into these issues, except my preference for having less mpc into my mouth when I'm sitting at the break (too much necessary work, as I mentioned above). True, a solid emb. can support it, and again, I was doing so with the Legere, but I don't like the feeling of it.

As far as the Berg is concerned, I pulled it out of the drawer as an experiment, I play the Law exclusively.

You're right, the tip openings have only a ~0.015 difference, but the difference was notable to me.

Reeds. This one is tough. I tried Java Red and Greens (2.5 for both) and neither gave me what I wanted. The feeling of a light reed on that piece is unpleasant. I know this will be contradictory, but there wasn't enough resistance. I ended up landing on 3.5 Reds and that was getting closer (this is all before I jumped on the Legere, which I was playing before getting that piece), but still not what I wanted. I did actually try the blue box Rico's (#3), didn't like those, either; just not for me. Didn't try the orange box Ricos, I've played enough of those to not even bother anymore. I tried Gonzales ...#3 I think (?), can't remember. Didn't like those reeds at all, on anything. Tried some LaVoz MH, didn't quite do it for me, but they were close. The reeds that I'm having the most success with are the Reserves in a #3+, but earlier tonight I ordered some regular #3, a bump down in size due to all of the research / suggestions I'm getting. I've tried light reeds on the piece, but not Reserves. I haven't tried Hemke on this piece, either, and I dug those a bit on alto and soprano years ago. I'm curious so hear / feel how those work on a high baffle mpc.

I'm definitely not trying to skimp out on the work, I'm very methodical in my shed sessions, specifically emb. / sound development. On days when I have very little time to shed, I never skip overtones, etc (I've been playing the horn as a second instrument seriously since 2007, and barring times when the household prevented it, there were months on end where the only thing I could get to were sound development exercises). I actually love the work process more than any other aspect of playing the horn. What I want is the right mpc for me, the work won't stop, the goal is to allow me to increase my workload by getting the setup out of my way. It may also be of interest that I'm shying away from the Jody Jazz pieces because of the amount of work they supposedly do for you. I don't want that. When I heard that, it reminded me of what I switched from a JJ HR to a John Thomas, to a Meyer, then found my home on a PhilTone Meyer when I was concentrating on alto. The JJ made everything extremely easy, but I felt 'locked in'. I don't know how to explain it other than to say all of the other pieces would allow me to slide out of control if I wasn't handling my business on the horn.

Law Buzzer: http://www.neffmusic.com/blog/2009/08/law-buzzer-tenor-mouthpiece/

These are the pains of transitioning back to cane (for me, that is). Yee hawl!...as they say in a place I'm not from :)

Thank you again for your response!
 
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