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Movers and Shakers! Entrepreneurs! Ladies and Gentlemen!

The time has come to relieve us Sax players from the strenuous duty of cleaning our Sax necks after a playing session.

Therefore, we call on all the creative minds on the forum: Solve this challenge for us. You will be rewarded by our community beyond belief.

Currently developing gyroprismatic laser guided nanoparticles for a breakthrough medical device? Here is your true market. Are you engeneering a small rodent with exchangeable micro fleece as a pelt? Think of the riches rewarded by all of us. Vying for total world domination by some sinister means? Here is your chance!

We are all waiting. By the edge of our third, forth and fifth chairs. In our familiar corners right by the paper coffee cup on the ground in front of us. In front of all the primary school orchestras playing hot cross bun. We are waiting.

What are you waiting for?
 

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Oh dear... are you trying to find a solution looking for a problem? Take a neck cleaner, stick it on a Dremel and run it for exactly 1.059 seconds. Timing is everything
 

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I use a soapy flute pad saver, then run some water through the neck. I take the neck octave key off before I clean it.
 

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Who says there are no stupid posts???
 

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I can't remember the last time I cleaned my neck - maybe 10 years ago? All the spit and condensation goes downstream. So only the horn needs a good swab after playing.

I do remember playing a school bari that smelled like something had crawled up into the loop and died. I did have to give that a very thorough cleaning.
 

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This may sound a bit gross, but on old necks that are encrusted inside and haven't been cleaned for years I remove the key, put plastic tape over the pip, and a rubber stopper in the small end. Then I carefully pour "The Works" toilet bowl cleaner inside and leave it there for 10 - 15 seconds. Then I rinse it out and fill the neck a few times with a baking soda solution to remove any remaining acid. The last step is to run a large brass brush on a snake through it with warm soapy water and then rinse. The brass on the inside of the neck is then as bright and clean as the day it was made.

To keep the interior of the neck in this like new condition I run a clarinet "hanky swab" through it a couple of times after playing. For those who are squeamish about using an acid that strong, you can substitute straight vinegar and leave it in 30 minutes to an hour instead of a few seconds.
 

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This may sound a bit gross, but on old necks that are encrusted inside and haven't been cleaned for years I remove the key, put plastic tape over the pip, and a rubber stopper in the small end. Then I carefully pour "The Works" toilet bowl cleaner inside and leave it there for 10 - 15 seconds. Then I rinse it out and fill the neck a few times with a baking soda solution to remove any remaining acid. The last step is to run a large brass brush on a snake through it with warm soapy water and then rinse. The brass on the inside of the neck is then as bright and clean as the day it was made.

To keep the interior of the neck in this like new condition I run a clarinet "hanky swab" through it a couple of times after playing. For those who are squeamish about using an acid that strong, you can substitute straight vinegar and leave it in 30 minutes to an hour instead of a few seconds.
It's only gross if you use toilet bowl cleaner that has already been in the toilet..............:shock:
 

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I actually did imagine a better swab, one that if pulled one way swabbed the neck, pulled another way swabbed the horn. My wife made a prototype using a bandanna, it worked. I forget why I stopped using it, I've been using other types of swabs for awhile now.
 

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Very amusing post but as others have pointed out, there are very simple solutions to this. I swap out my neck after every gig but at home I do it about once a week.
 

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For before the neck gets all gunky inside, and to keep it that way, Hodge makes a whole sax, silk pull-thru that will swab your sax body, neck, and mouthpiece while horn is all together. Just make sure you take the reed off the mouthpiece first! Be forewarned, the weight on the end of the string is a rubber-coated, tear-dropped shape. Depending on a given particular neck, it may not exit easily, if at all, from the narrow end of the neck. Or, depending on your mouthpiece chamber, it may not go thru the mouthpiece either.

I personally use a Jewel, whole sax, silk pull-thru that uses a differently shaped weight on the end of the string. It's about a 3/4" long, 1/4" in diameter, rubber-coated cylinder with no worries about it fitting through the neck and/or mouthpiece whatsoever.

Hodge still sells their swab, my Jewel swab must be ~10 years old and don't seem to be available anymore but those are the two I have personal experience with. Others have provided additional options.

Swabs will only keep the bore pretty much clean. If the OP is looking for a grunge removal method, well, there are others that have much more experience than I with that aspect of horn maintenance and restoration...
 

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How in the heck can I wash my neck . . . ?

 

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Who says there are no stupid posts???
:| I don't think anybody has ever said that, have they ?????

I use a soapy flute pad saver, then run some water through the neck. I take the neck octave key off before I clean it.
I commend you :salute: ...it's hella hard to play a soapy flute
 

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Start with a clean neck - wash it out with a neck brush and rinse. Get yourself a neck stuffer and put it in. Take it out to play and put it back in. I bend the end of mine and kind of thread it in to get full wiping. Take it out and wash the stuffer every so often depending on how often you play.
 

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I don't think this is a stupid post. For player's that never clean their necks out you'll be horrified by the build up of scum that accumulates over time.
 

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I don't think this is a stupid post. For player's that never clean their necks out you'll be horrified by the build up of scum that accumulates over time.
I wouldn't call the desire to keep the neck clean stupid, true.

But there is a slight trolling quality in the OP.

People have chimed in with a good half-dozen, existing methods which all work quite fine. So as Turf said, this thread is really asking for a solution to a situation which has already been solved, probably tenfold....

There are a lot of methods out there already. It's sorta unlikely that a significant # of players (not to mention techs) do not know of/employ any of them.
 

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The state of a neck's interior depends on what the player blows into it.

1. Moist breath. Little issue. Use HW Products: https://www.amazon.com/s?k=hw+products&ref=nb_sb_noss_2 and leave them in the instrument.

2. Saliva, containing whatever. It should not be blown into the sax. Collect it in a space under the end of the tongue, just back from the lower teeth, and swallow it when the opportunity arises.

3. The biggie... a heap of dead tissue from the tongue &/or lining of the mouth. This is what makes a thick, gooey, off-white mess, no doubt bacteria-laden just like the unhealthy source it came from! Totally reach-worthy for a technician to deal with. Yuck!!!

Of course some players also blow snotty stuff all over the outside of their sax, encouraging corrosion. Does that come from their mouth or their nose? One of my customers acknowledges that he is a "wet player". What a euphemism!
 
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