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I've been looking at some photos of an old horn for sale. The owner knows little about it except that it is an Oscar Adler and an alto (originally he advertised it as a tenor). I was a bit stumped when I could not see the 2nd bell key on the other side of the bell. I know it was common back then to have them separated into each side of the bell, but as far as I can tell this one only has one! I'll try to post a photo or two but given my computer is on the blink this may be tricky.
 

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I've been looking at some photos of an old horn for sale. The owner knows little about it except that it is an Oscar Adler and an alto (originally he advertised it as a tenor). I was a bit stumped when I could not see the 2nd bell key on the other side of the bell. I know it was common back then to have them separated into each side of the bell, but as far as I can tell this one only has one! I'll try to post a photo or two but given my computer is on the blink this may be tricky.
Very early saxophones only went down to low B. Probably is one of those if the bell also looks shorter than it should.
 

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The microtuner neck seems weird though for 'old'. I didn't think those came out until the 30's and I thought Conn was the only company that did them.

Another possibility it's a SSO (Saxophone shaped object) from India..
 

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In Europe it was pretty common to have saxophones built for military bands (or marching bands) that were ordered with reduced keywork in order to cut on costs. In Italy we call them "ministeriali"

The main differences were usually lack of BisB, no F# trill key, simplified mechanism but everything could be mixed and matched: there was no mass production.

I had a copy of a catalogue from an Italian factory that was -I think- from around 1920 and still listed rollers on C and Eb keys and Low Bb as optionals.
 

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Oscar Adler was the first German Saxophone manufacturer, beginning to build saxophones in 1901.

The microtoner is a very common feature of old German horns, but I have no idea when it was introduced.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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This is most certainly NO Indian saxophone although saxophones like this are often played by Carnatic players

Sometimes they are also High Pitch ( most Carnatic Players do use HP instruments).

Short range saxophones were made, as said before, by many makers.

Aside the German ones, French and Belgian and Dutch and Italian horns have surfaced many times and indeed we've discussed these often times before in threads like this.

Even some post WWII show at times features of very old instruments.

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?236111-quot-antique-quot-Couesnon-Alto-low-B-natural

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?272034-Rare-Couesnon-Tenor-or-C



 

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Another missing item is the articulated G#. The G# on this horn is direct acting like a flute or clarinet. They only downside is that you need to not press the G# lever when playing the right hand stack keys.
 
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