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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I acquired this old soprano many years ago, can't remember what I paid for it but it wasn't much, probably less than $100. I remember being able to play it at that time - tone was pretty nice, intonation was troublesome in the upper register. Its been sitting on a shelf for 20 years or so and now I thought it might be worth another look.

Here's the markings:

Rene Guenot
Paris
10. Rue Beaurepaire
Essaye par L. Meyer
Garde Republicaine

There's a number 395 stamped on the barrel near the lower D key

It needs some work now, a spring or two is broke and one of the upper keys is open, not sure what else. Probably needs some pads. Tarnished, worn in places, silver-plated originally (?).

Opinions please - get it overhauled, turn it into a lamp?
 

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Sopranos make great lamps! I have one by my bed.
 

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Don´t commit that crime. All sopranos are troublesome in the upper register in some way or another.
Bring it to life, at worst scenario you will find yourself screaming like Dr.Frankestein "It´s alive, it´s alive!".
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So, I put a rubber band around the high F key that was open because of a busted spring, and it actually plays, mostly.
 

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My vote is fix it. Sounds like it might not even need a full repad/overhaul.
 

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You might consider doing a little research. I think these were stencils, but well made. I saw one comment comparing them to the Selmer Model 26.
 

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Oh, please don't make a lamp out of it. That is what clarinets are for!!
 

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A stencil is when a manufacturer, say Conn for instance, creates an instrument and puts a different brand label on it.

For example, Buescher and several others made "Elkhart" saxes. Keilwerth made the Couf Superbas among others. SML stenciled horns under the Reynolds and King Marigaux names.

This was a common practice especially for American saxes in the '20s and '30s. It still lives on in the form of various Chinese/Taiwanese manufacturers making a boatload of different brands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A stencil is when a manufacturer, say Conn for instance, creates an instrument and puts a different brand label on it.

For example, Buescher and several others made "Elkhart" saxes. Keilwerth made the Couf Superbas among others. SML stenciled horns under the Reynolds and King Marigaux names.

This was a common practice especially for American saxes in the '20s and '30s. It still lives on in the form of various Chinese/Taiwanese manufacturers making a boatload of different brands.
Thanks
 

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Another aspect of stencils is the variation of quality compared to the mother brand. Many American stencils were quite inferior. In contrast, many of the European stencils, especially Couf and King-Marigaux, were excellent quality horns.
 

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if it's high-pitched, no problem with lamping it. If low pitched, still might not be worth the cash to restore, however low-priced soprano project horns are rare.

Could those markings indicate some sort of French Military connection?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hadn't thought about the pitch, think it must be low. It came with two mpcs, one is unmarked the other is a Selmer S80 C*. I had to shove it fairly far up the neck to get it in tune. After that the intonation's not too bad, better than I remember, in fact. Somewhere I read that the markings indicate it was made for the presidential band (?).
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
UPDATE: took it in to my tech and he said a couple pads were leaking, plus the busted spring. So I left it with him to do the minimal then we'll see how it plays. Who knows, I could be the senior citizen's answer to Kenny G.

BTW, I also took my YAS-62 in, just to have a look even though it seemed to be playing quite nicely. Turned out it was leaking a little, too. He ended up taking out most of the pads and reseating them, tweaking the bell slightly back into correct position. really nice, now. Would'a thunk?
 
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