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Great, very well done, congrats!
 

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very nice " spiritual" feel. Surprisingly (at least to me, since I listen often to your work) the upper part of the tonal extension sounds a little more buzzy on alto than it sounds on soprano.

I think this piece has a nice beginning which promises some sort of development which, I am afraid, fails to be reached. In other words, it appears to be going somewhere but then it doesn't go in any particular direction and stays where it all started.

I know that these pieces are the fruit of an unplanned impro and they are what they are, sketches of creativity. Sometimes the ideas start forming in one's head but they can disappear as quickly as they get formed at times, there is not telling. Very nice that you do it and record it all. I admire very much both efforts and results.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks swsw1550 and Milandro. The buzz is probably just this old reed that I refuse to throw out. It's a fibrecell that's more than eight months old and is just so comfortable like an old pair of warm slippers.

You're right about this piece going nowhere. The guitarist will be just playing a few chords and trying out a feel or rhythm, then hits the loop and after a few bars hits it again, and that's it. That’s the whole palate for painting the picture. No B part, no recapitulation, etc. That's also why most are fade-outs. They aren't real compositions, just modal exercises within which to improvise. The recorder is on at most practice sessions, so if there's anything interesting it gets edited into this sort of format. We probably have over two hundred of these by now.

We have about 50 semi-original pieces that we use for our cafe gigs. These are semi-improvised pieces based on ethnic music ranging from Mexican to African to Vietnamese and lots of other stops between. The challenge is in remembering each as nothing's written down. The only "standard" we play is Heart and Soul, but that's pretty heavily tweaked into an African rhythm.

I'd prefer exploring somewhere new/different rather than doing set pieces, but that's kind of difficult for the venues we play. Fortunately we take time at practice to go off somewhere different on occasions.

Your comments are always welcome and as ever insightful.
 

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I greatly admire your passionate work. I would like to be engaging in this type of playing but I am afraid that all the people I play with are well and truly trapped in the standards comfort zone.

One of the bands I play with (Duinzand, Dune sand ) is a quintet where we , every now and again play some purely improvised things but it is mostly blues and it is not as adventurous as this.
 

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The larger the group the more difficult it is. If you have a keyboard player or guitarist in that group who you can get alongside you might find that it's easier to quickly find common ground. Having a format/style (blues, rock, etc.) makes the larger group feasible, but very difficult if trying to do something that doesn't fit into a "familiar box".

Since the guitarist and myself often explore various ethnic styles this keeps our reference of modes, melodic ideas, and rhythms fairly wide.

If you have a lot of confidence in your playing and taking more of a lead role, then playing with just a bass player can be very challenging, but also incredibly rewarding. When it's really working all of that space in-between gets filled by the imagination.
 

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Good advice! I have tried free improvisation at the Bimhuis in Amsterdam where they weekly have a workshop (Tuesday nights 20:00 to 10:00 ) where anybody can walk in with an instrument of any sort or play the resident drums and piano and improvise.

The problem I found there is that having no idea of the kind of thing that you are going to play it is difficult to tune in in few second to the " mood" and feel that the initiator chooses ( assuming that he or she is able to play and communicate that).

Of course it would be better to find someone with who you have a certain affinity of experience and taste to do something a little more constructive and develop a language together by having at least a general sense of what the mood would be like.

I have been thinking to involve a bass player but unfortunately the one who would be perfect for the job is always very busy.
 
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