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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I wondered if anyone could help with some information on a tenor sax. It looks quite old as it has tone holes (is that the right term) on either side of the bell. I'm told it is a "ALBERT" though I can see no engraving. It has a number " 5375 " engraved on it.

Here is a link to pictures,


Thanks in advance.
 

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Not an 'Albert' system. That applies to clarinets.
The other guys here that are 'pros' at 'identification' can give you a better idea of year/make/model.
 

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Not an 'Albert' system. That applies to clarinets.
The other guys here that are 'pros' at 'identification' can give you a better idea of year/make/model.
Hi I realise that "Albert" usually refers to clarinets from the bit of reading I have done. The seller advertised this as an "Albert". When I e-mailed him about the sax he replied that he thought it was made by a Belgian maker who he thought was named Albert and Co.
The sax looks pretty old to me and he is selling it at a cheap price and I am trying to find out a little bit more about it. I thought even if it played a little rough it might be a good way to practice my finger work and see if playing a sax is for me after all or just a long term fantasy.
Thanks for the reply.
 

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I wonder if this is a saxophone was made by Jacques Albert ? I had one many years ago and can't remember much about it except it was engraved with the makers name and, underneath, Paris. I vaguely remember being told his workshop was in Brussels, which ties in with what you have been told, so maybe having Paris on the bell sounded more prestigious. If you research Jacques Albert Fils you may find out a bit more. I can't get your 'photo link to work properly but from the little I could see this appears to be a design from not much later than the early 1930's. It could have been made much earlier.

It looks like a lovely instrument but most people wouldn't consider it worth much cash..........that's not the same as not worth having. As for it being in playing condition lots of very small faults could prevent it from being playable. Saxophones tend to be in playing condition or not. Very small leaks, for example, where the round leather pads seal on the tone holes will makes a saxophone very difficult to play indeed. There's nothing that can't be fixed but if there's a lot of work to be done by a specialist repairer it could cost much more than it's worth. If it was in good playing order there's no reason why someone couldn't play it very well. I learnt to play on something very similar and survived the experience. Come back and ask further questions if you need to..........
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply.
I'm aware of leaks etc affecting playability.
It does look a neat instrument and I guess that if it is very old the keys would have a different set up to more modern instruments which would not be a good thing for me. I'm too old to learn two sets of fingering.
The picture link works fine for me, left clicking changes to the next picture and depending on your screen size you may need to scroll to see all the picture.
 

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You are making some interesting assumptions.

Old saxes, even archaic ones, don't have a different fingering than what we are familiar with today (with the exception of the multiple octave keys on old, old, old horns). So it looks like it'd play just like a regular sax.

With that said...this horn is hella old. Without even having learned of the excellent info A'Cat gave above, most vintage folks can tell you this is hella old...talking pre-1930's definitely, probably pre-1920's. It also looks like a mess, requiring a full workup, despite the fact that the body may be in good physical shape.

Why do I assume this ? Because the body metal is in the shape it's in...and in most instances, if the body finish looks like that, then moisture and such has also gotten into the rods, barrels, pivot screws, springs, etc...and this is a gigantic can of worms.

If you are into really old horns as a collector, go for it. But if you want a sax to play, this would be a pretty bad choice (again, unless you are in some sorta musical group which utilizes very vintage instruments). I also agree that its market value is probably negligible....it ain't a "find", particularly.

Interesting little mystery, though.....I always like those....
 

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Hi I wondered if anyone could help with some information on a tenor sax. It looks quite old as it has tone holes (is that the right term) on either side of the bell. I'm told it is a "ALBERT" though I can see no engraving. It has a number " 5375 " engraved on it.

Here is a link to pictures,


Thanks in advance.
Seems to be a René Guénot, and according the number from 1933-34
 

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Looks completely playable in the modern context, as long as it's not high pitch. It has the automatic octave key and is fully keyed to high F. From what I can tell, the keywork looks a lot like an old Conn, but the key guards have the "duck feet" typical of older French saxes.

I don't agree that it looks in particularly rough shape, it's just a silver plated sax that has tarnished. My silver plated baritone, which I play every week, looks much worse than that.

If you already own this, take it to a repairman and ask him to put it in "basic playing condition". If you don't own it, don't pay very much for it. If you aren't concerned about brand snobbery, you might end up with a rather nice instrument for little money - or you might end up with a really blah undistinguished instrument for little money. It probably will not be horrible.
 
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