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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I bought this Cadet bari about a year ago. I like it but really can't find out hardly any information about these horns. Anyone here know anything about it? I've attached some photos to help. The only identifiying mark is Cadet. I can't even find a serial number. All I know is that it has a nice fat sound and tuning is not too bad. For $300.00 I sure can't complain. That even included some work by a local tech to get it sealing.

The key-work is kind of cheap and awkward but the horn really has no signs of serious abuse. It is not really heavy either. I just got the Metalite #9 mouthpiece for the thing. It now sounds like a truck when you push it!

Any idea of the maker or continent of origin?

Here are some photos to help with identification:


Like the stand? I made it out of an old tenor stand and guitar stand parts. :bluewink:










 

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I don't know about the horn, but is that a Rico Metalite on there? If it is... it rocks!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes it is a #9 Metalite!

My Metal Larson 105/0 just sounded terrible with this horn. The upper register was almost 1/2 step sharp and it really didn't move enough air to work in electric R&B situations. Oddly, the Larson worked fine with Yamaha and Yanagisawa baris that I have borrowed for gigs and recording in recent years. This particular horn came to me with an old HR pickle barrel mouthpiece that sounded great and played with pretty good intonation. It is a nice set-up for concert band or small, quiet ensembles.

I got the this horn to save me the trouble of borrowing instruments from school band-rooms for the odd bari gig that I pick up from time to time. I always need to spend some time tweeking adjustments on these horns to get them to work the way I want. I think that is why they get lent to me. They always come back in better playing condition!

Pitch was so bad with the Berg Larson that I was about to sell this horn to someone who could use it in a concert band or other situation where large chambered mouthpieces would be the ticket. The Metalite was my last ditch effort to see if I could get the horn to work for my intended purpose. It works great!. I have not had a mouthpiece that works this well with a baritone since I was in college over 30 years ago and regularly borrowed my friend's vintage Berg Larson HR 120/0 mouthpiece. This comes very close to producing the solid core with edge that I was looking for. It also moves enough air to be heard in the situations where I will play it. Pitch is pretty darned good too! I now have a good starting place to dial in the left hand palm keys with crescents.

All in all.......this is a fantastic set-up for $330.00 that I have invested. I spent about 6 hours playing it over the past couple of days.

My girlfriend says I sound like Ronnie Cuber.....of course, she loves me! :love34:
 

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It doesn't look East German (Weltklank-B&S) or made in the Czech republic (Amati) It is definitely not American made and vaguely features some Selmeresque elements which are so typical of asian horns. Could be early Taiwanese ( I doubt that) Chinese, Brazilian (Weril but I doubt because those have a octave key on the neck)
 

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Some aspects looka bit like Conn so it also looks a bit like a Malerne or one of those other makes that built Malerne-like horns. (I havent' seen a Malerne bari before. )
 

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of course if it would be an american made baritone it would have an octave key on the neck
 

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Looks Asian to me. Probably won't be overly reliable down the road but it's proabably the best thing you can find for less than $1500 or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I was kind of thinking Malerne, then I compared it to my Malerne back-up tenor. Not even close. The large body to bell ring looks like the older Yanagisawa horns. I took a look at pdf of Weril saxophones and this one shares the in-line tone hole arrangement but differs in the side C and Bb keys. It has no ribs on the body. It has a hinged Bb key but low C# is not articulated. That makes for some interesting thumb and pinky work in the sharp keys! The octave key and low A key are similar to the Mark VI arrangement.

It's an interesting hodge-podge of design elements for sure.
 

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Looks Asian to me. Probably won't be overly reliable down the road but it's proabably the best thing you can find for less than $1500 or so.
It doesn't look East German (Weltklank-B&S) or Czech . It is definitely not American made and vaguely features some Selmeresque elements which are so typical of asian horns. Could be early Taiwanese ( I doubt that) Chinese, Brazilian (Weril but I doubt because those have a octave key on the neck)

Agreed. There is nothing about that horn that is European....be it Malerne or German or Italian or another French maker.

The touches and such do look asian to me...perhaps 80's Japanese...could possibly be.....
 

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I had a Chinese alto with that exact same color lacquer… if that helps!
 

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if it were Japanese it would be Yamaha or Yanagisawa (there are no other brands) and it ain't
 
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