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I've been playing now for a number of years, and have always enjoyed it. I don't know why you would switch out the neck on your sax.

So I got a Mark VI and a Committee III, why would I want to switch out the original necks out on those? Do the new necks offer a better range? Better sound? I know that mouthpieces help with different tones, new reeds, even new pads with tone boosters. Why necks though?

It's not that I doubt that it wouldn't help. I'm not trying to knock anyone who does it, but I guess I just don't understand the benefits of a different neck than the original.

So please help me wrap my head around on why you do it.
 

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Better sound is subjective. Certainly, you can get a different sound and playability on other necks.

At one time, I had 4 necks for my mark 6 tenor and even experimented with putting a Selmer Sterling plus on a committee 3. But the best example is in swapping out a few Selmer necks and horns with colleagues. The 'sound' goes with the neck not the horn. (Side note, the Ponzol was as good as the one voted best from a 140's Varitone). I also own a Conn 26m that the owner had modified to take a Mark 6 neck. Comparing it to a similar vintage 6m was also a telling experience.

So, for a player with a fair collection of mouthpieces, a neck will give you better bang for the buck than another mouthpiece. I'd love a replica of a good 5 digit neck.
 

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There are a number of "benefits" that could potentially be discovered by swapping necks. Tuning, sound quality, and response are a few that come to mind. I haven't done much experimenting myself, but of the little I've done, I can say that I have noticed a difference, some of it audible, and some if it just in the overall "feel" or playability. I think the best way to answer this question for yourself is to simply experiment and determine if you notice any benefits. Perhaps you could also have someone with you, to see if they can pinpoint any differences.

As for why someone would ever be drawn to swap necks in the first place - maybe to change things up a bit, find a new color in their sound, or perhaps to answer similar question(s) for themselves.
 

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I've been playing now for a number of years, and have always enjoyed it. I don't know why you would switch out the neck on your sax.

So I got a Mark VI and a Committee III, why would I want to switch out the original necks out on those? Do the new necks offer a better range? Better sound? I know that mouthpieces help with different tones, new reeds, even new pads with tone boosters. Why necks though?

It's not that I doubt that it wouldn't help. I'm not trying to knock anyone who does it, but I guess I just don't understand the benefits of a different neck than the original.

So please help me wrap my head around on why you do it.
If you are happy with your horns, stop right there.

If your horn has "issues", sometime - just sometimes - it might be related to the neck. Or not.

I've recently had two horns (Selmer Serie II and Borgani Jubilee altos) that came with a choice of necks - in both cases, the alternative necks (Ponzol, Gloger) brought some "extra", but if they were not there for comparison, I'd be just as happy with the original necks.

Back when I was playing a Ref 36, I tried several other Selmer Ref 36 and Ref 54 necks, plus a Selmer Sterling Silver - all were different, but the original neck was the best match in that case.

Realize also that there is tremendous potential to be gained from having your neck properly fitted to the tenon. Losses there can swamp any gains from a custom neck.

Bottom line: If you've got a good neck that is properly fitted to your horn, you are There.
 

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I ordered a used Paraschos tenor neck, with a great trial period and return policy. It just so happened that I preferred the sound and response of it on my specific instrument. I mainly bought to see if it could help response, but I ended up liking the sound as well. If you're happy with how your instrument is playing, there's no need to try neck swapping.
 

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I've been playing now for a number of years, and have always enjoyed it. I don't know why you would switch out the neck on your sax.

So I got a Mark VI and a Committee III, why would I want to switch out the original necks out on those? Do the new necks offer a better range? Better sound? I know that mouthpieces help with different tones, new reeds, even new pads with tone boosters. Why necks though?

It's not that I doubt that it wouldn't help. I'm not trying to knock anyone who does it, but I guess I just don't understand the benefits of a different neck than the original.

So please help me wrap my head around on why you do it.
My business makes necks and it is a six of one, half dozen of the other situation. However, my necks give the player a bigger, more spread sound, and a fatter upper register. In fact the whole register is fatter and more spread. Now, you may not like this because you lose a little focus but that depends on the mouthpiece you play. Christian is right though, if you're happy with your gear just leave it alone. Phil Barone
 

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It's not that I doubt that it wouldn't help. I'm not trying to knock anyone who does it, but I guess I just don't understand the benefits of a different neck than the original.

So please help me wrap my head around on why you do it.
I use an 01 Buescher Aristocrat neck on my True Tone alto. Some believe the New Aristocrat alto was basically a True Tone with different neck choices (at least three different ones were offered for the horn at the time). All I know is that the 01 Aristocrat neck that I use cleans up intonational quirks that were common complaints with the True Tone series (basically sharp notes above A2). When I made the switch, there really wasn't a difference in the sound of the horn. Just better intonation.

So there you have an instance of where a particular neck from the same company might be used in place of an original to alleviate specific concerns. Most necks choice varieties these days however are purely market driven. So yeah, I'm with the others. If you don't have a problem, don't go looking for one.
 
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