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You might be able to get away with removing the neck key and very carefully bending the spring with your fingers to give it more curve. If it breaks, it means that it was failing anyway. Music Medic now sells individual flat springs. You need to use a caliper to measure the thickness and length of the spring in millimeters. You might also check to see if the key is rubbing the side of its "saddle" causing friction. This can make it feel sluggish as well.
 

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I'm a bit confused. There are typically no "pivot screws" involved anywhere in an octave mechanism or a neck octave key. Perhaps we are using different nomenclature for things. The picture below represents what are called "pivot screws" where I am from. The threaded steel rods that go inside hinge tubes (key barrels in the UK) are generally called "hinge rods", but some of the older techs refer to them as "steels".

Fastener Household hardware Tool Nickel Screw
 

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Hopefully not being overly pedantic... the common term is "rod screw". If it has a thread on it it's a type of screw. If it is the key part itself it is a "hinge".
So "pivot screws" and "rod screws" are the two types of screws for hinges, the small ones at both ends and the long ones through the key respectively.
"Hinge tube" and "hinge rod" are hollow and solid respectively.
Interesting. In the U.S. it appears that both terms are used. Hinge Screw Rod. . . . . . . . Hinge Rod
 
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