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Discussion Starter #1
Burning question: what tenors have the octave key actuated by the rod offset to the right of the key in the manner that Selmer SBA's have done? Most modern tenors I have seen, have the rod to the left of the octave key. What's the difference? The ease of the thumb in moving through the arc established by the Selmer mechanism is what I'm looking for to provide relief for my thumb. Selmer can't be the only one. Did Pierret, or any other maker do this?

Anyone have a tenor with the the octave rod to the right? If so, I'd really like to know.
 

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I assume you are wanting to know which current production horns have that design feature, as nearly ALL the vintage Tenors have the rod mounted on the right, including Conn, King, Martin, Buescher etc.
 

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Taking a look at my photo catalog of horns I own and have owned, Not a one modern design appears to have the key mounted in the old way including: Keilwerth, Modern Selmer models, Yamaha, Yanagisawa, B&S, etc., yet just about all of my vintage Tenors have it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks. That's what I was worried about. Looks like I won't be buying anymore modern horns. Damn. I was contemplating trying one of Phil Barone's Taiwan deals. But they seem to be copying Mauriat which is copying modern Selmers as far as the octave key is concened, and oh well. . .
 

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SAXISMYAXE said:
Taking a look at my photo catalog of horns I own and have owned, Not a one modern design appears to have the key mounted in the old way including: Keilwerth, Modern Selmer models, Yamaha, Yanagisawa, B&S, etc., yet just about all of my vintage Tenors have it.
Very interesting. Why this change, do you think? It sounds like an absolute sea change, all of a sudden. Did a huge meteor strike the saxophone industry and kill off all the old mountings, like the dinosaurs, who then turned into birds somehow? And while you're at it, would you explain that too?

Seriously, though, this seems an odd bit of saxophone evolution that would be interesting to elucidate, if it can be done.
 

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I think that the pivotal change in keywork design over all (including this octave key design) was a result of the new and somewhat revolutionary Selmer MKVI layout.

Most subsequent keywork design, regardless of make/model, seems to be heavily if not totally based on the MKVI and the following evolutionary Selmer (Super Action) keywork layouts.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
SAXISMYAXE said:
I think that the pivotal change in keywork design over all (including this octave key design) was a result of the new and somewhat revolutionary Selmer MKVI layout.

Most subsequent keywork design, regardless of make/model, seems to be heavily if not totally based on the MKVI and the following evolutionary Selmer (Super Action) keywork layouts.
Yes, that was the sea-change Reedsplinter was identifying. Why it happened is probably no longer important due to the likelihood that it was a good enough design and the VI was an economic success. If they had mounted it with bamboo and rubber bands then THAT is what everyone would be doing today. An exaggeration, but . . .

This is one of those aspects that keeps many of us hounding after vintage horns. I just love my pre-VI Selmer SBA with the rod on the right. Or I should say, my thumb loves it.

My SML King Marigaux is right mounted too. I love the sound of the Selmer Series II, a modern horn, but it's rod is left mounted.
 
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