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Discussion Starter #1
View attachment 30666

View attachment 30667

View attachment 30668

Alrite, above is the octave key assembly on my Yanagisawa 901 alto. Could I get a picture of someone's properly working octave assembly from that angle? It seems to me that there's a small gap on one of the parts, and it's causing a lot of play in the action when I press the octave key. It was recently repaired at a shop, but hasn't played the same since... They may have used empirical parts on my metric saxophone.

Also, good shot of my custom mother of pearl lyer knob; got it off of an old trumpet valve =)
 

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I think what you need to do is go find another Yanagisawa at a local music store if possible and take a pic for yourself. I would take a picture of mine for you,but I don't have access to a camera at the moment.
 

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The photos are bit fuzzy - but it looks to me like the swivel arm (aka the see-saw rocker) is rather loose on its pin. It may have had a teflon sleeve fitted to the pin (like the ones on the end of the swivel arm). If that's the case, and its missing, you'll get a lot of movement on the octave key touchpiece before anything else starts to move.

Regards,
 

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Ah yes, that's it... now I remember it did have a teflon sleeve.... now to track one down on the web. I've been losing sleep over this anomaly, so thank you, Stephen.

EDIT: I found a repair shop nearby that is willing to order the part for me! Now, is it something I can simply pop on, or will I need to disassemble the mechanism and use a special tool?
 

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It's easy enough to replace.
You'll need to dismantle the octave key mechanism - if I were you I'd start by removing the thumb key. You could also remove the G key too - it makes things a little simpler.

When dismantling the rocker section, keep in mind that the rocker can sometimes be 'handed'. That's to say that it might work better one way round than another - so try to preserve the orientation when you remove it (no big deal if you don't - just might mean having to dismantle again).

You might need a pair of pliers to get the rod screw out. If you don't have any smooth-jawed pliers, wrap some tape around the jaws to help prevent marking the rod...and be gentle.

Remember to oil the rod screw before reassembly.

Regards,
 

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you can wrap teflon plumbers tape aroung the central pin to take up play. don't make it too tight or too loose. alot of the teflon tubing sold is a bit too thick.
 

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You can get heat shrink teflon tubing in various diameters that will suit this sort of application (MusicMedic sells it).

Use the diameter tubing that fits over the pin best (with the internal diameter of the tubing either being the same or slightly larger than the diameter of the pin) and if it's still slightly loose, heat it over a flame (as opposed to in a flame) and it'll shrink down to fit tightly onto the pin. Then fit the rocker while it's still warm and make sure it spins with as little resistance as possible.
 
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