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Discussion Starter #1
After fixing many oboes ( and not being an oboist! ) a thought hit me- since both the oboe and saxophone are conical, octave based systems- why not make an oboe using the much simpler sax key system? It would much simpler to manufacture as well as to play. Sax players could play one essentially at once.
Has anyone already done this?

Jerry
 

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It no different to saying, why not modify clarinet to play like a sax / flute fingering. It unfortunatetly doesnt happen anymore, the fingerings are the fingerings, oboes are not that bad anyway, there may be some custom units out there but they certainly are not the standrad run of the mill
 

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Isn't that what Kenny G plays? Sounds like it anyway.
 

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Let's see, cause F on saxophone is f# on oboe, plus Bb and c.....and then half hole d and eb....

It won't work. It would be a mess of mechanics and.......just learn the oboe fingerings. It's not that hard. In fact, the fingerings are probably the easiest part of oboe.
 

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After fixing many oboes ( and not being an oboist! ) a thought hit me- since both the oboe and saxophone are conical, octave based systems- why not make an oboe using the much simpler sax key system? It would much simpler to manufacture as well as to play. Sax players could play one essentially at once.
Has anyone already done this?

Jerry
Hi Jerry

I think Chris Peryagh (another SOTW member from the U.K) has already done this. It is a nice idea... I would very much like to try one.
 

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After fixing many oboes ( and not being an oboist! ) a thought hit me- since both the oboe and saxophone are conical, octave based systems- why not make an oboe using the much simpler sax key system? It would much simpler to manufacture as well as to play. Sax players could play one essentially at once.
Has anyone already done this?
Yes, I used to have a Ubel sax fingered oboe. I used it professionally only once (on a TV session with Sting years ago). But I was never going to be a decent oboist and needed it so rarely I sold it.
 

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.....just learn the oboe fingerings. It's not that hard. In fact, the fingerings are probably the easiest part of oboe.
Exactly what I was going to say. Also, the slightly different keywork of the different woodwinds kind of helps me get into the zone of playing that instrument embouchure wise. To me, clarinet keywork is part of playing clarinet, same with flute and oboe. If I felt sax keys on any of those, it would actually confuse me.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
DD- many thanks for the link to the historical paper- it pretty well explains why a seemingly reasonable idea did not take hold. I wonder what the chances would be for a manufacturer to introduce a model today. Also, if anyone knows the whereabouts of one of Loree's sax-oboes, I'd be interested in purchasing it.

Jerry
 

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The tone of an oboe may have something to do with the long tone hole chimneys (for their diameter). As with other timber instruments such as bassoon, bagpipes, recorder, clarinet. Perhaps the longer chimneys on a wooden flute are largely responsible for the different tone compared with metal flutes.

A sax, like flute and tin whistle, has very short chimneys.
 

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The tone of an oboe may have something to do with the long tone hole chimneys (for their diameter). As with other timber instruments such as bassoon, bagpipes, recorder, clarinet. Perhaps the longer chimneys on a wooden flute are largely responsible for the different tone compared with metal flutes.

A sax, like flute and tin whistle, has very short chimneys.
Now that makes sense! The chineys on metal clarinets are of similar height to those one wood and plastic clarinets, which is why, I think, there is very little differnce tonally among them (yes, some musicians can here the subtleties, but many cannot, and a non-musician can't hear it at all!)
 

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Bassoons are very long, Ive found even pads fitted poorly, that is with a leak light you can see minature leaks which would affect most other instruments makes no difference to a bassoon
 
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