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I really liked that video of violinist vs oboeist.
Now, is there a video where the oboe player gets be a beginner violinist? I would like to see that too!
As a schoolboy I really wanted to learn violin. Think Flock or Jean Luc Ponty, google Dinosaur Swamps. The reality was it made my arm ache. Hmmm said the music teacher and gave me a double bass. Fitted me like a glove and I never looked back!
 

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So over the my school winter break, I've been putting in some time on the ole' oboe and flute. Flute is a regular double and I haven't put in serious practice in many years. Oboe is still 'up and coming.' After I decided to work with soft-ish reeds and quit trying to fight the reed, I've made real progress.

Sax, Flute, and Clarinet seem to make logical sense in terms of keys. Oboe seems to be intentionally designed to be difficult to play. The Eb and c pinky and F/F# are flipped and a double octave key. Saxophones lost that in the late 1800's. About ? of the keys have a purpose but I have yet to need them.

The last a most interesting item is that the more you spend on an oboe the easier they are to play. Automatic Octave Key, Third Octave Key, Left Hand F, all the trill keys, no pinky needed for Forked F, and a Low Bb. Imagine giving a beginner sax player a double octave key saxophone without bell keys and charging $2,000.
Assuming that the instrument has no leaks and is produced by a known manufacturer, the problems described in this thread are overcome by using a good reed and PRACTICING. Fifteen minutes per day doesn't cut it.

If there was ever an argument for practicing long tones, it certainly applies to playing the oboe. It is the only way to get a sense keeping it in tune and for getting a feel for the response of all of the notes. I have returned to playing oboe after a hiatus of 40+ years. It is a difficult instrument for sure. My neck and face muscles ache after awhile and I find having to actually "dump" air while playing to be an interesting thing.

Diligence is the key to getting over the initial hurdles and extended frequent practice is the key to mastery.

Don't give up. The oboe has a long and interesting history of evolution. Knowledge of that history may be enlightening.
 
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