Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm just double checking on the meaning of these symbols... I've only ever seen them sax transcriptions but they are in Phil Woods Sonata 1st mvmt.


o = overtone on note below

+ = ???? alt fingering?


Thanks!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,312 Posts
I think you're right about 0 (overtone on note below). I think + indicates augmented chord.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,913 Posts
When used together, alternating, they can mean signify the two different fingerings of a double density, or false fingering. Rather like an open and closing of a plunger mute on a trumpet.

However I don't know the Phil Woods sonata so I'm just throwing this out there. The + sign with a chord does indeed mean augmented, and a º can mean a harmonic, especially on music for strings. I haven't seen it on saxophone music, but I'm sure it exists to mean that.

Of course, with a chord symbol º means diminished and ø means half dimininished (m7b5)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
When I performed this at univeristy, I played the + notes with falls fingerings, thus giving a different timbre.
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,011 Posts
Just a side thought: This is why it's so important to listen to the recording. The written notation for a jazz solo is only an approximation, at best.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,814 Posts
^
The second way is wrong. It's like playing a Bach fugue as a jazz tune (one of the reasons I don't like Brubeck). It just doesn't work.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Sax Historian
Joined
·
7,107 Posts
For brass players, I think + means mute in and o means mute out.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,913 Posts

·
SOTW Administrator
Joined
·
26,207 Posts
I'm sure it can, because that's Pete Thomas' website. LOL
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
Joined
·
7,356 Posts
One I used to do a bit is switch between regular C, Side C and first overtone C. And you can of course do it an octave up.

You can kind of get these little burbles.

You'd go C,C(B fingering),C,C overtone. Over and over.

Kind of a cool variation on the regular Boo-Ap Boo-Ap C to Low C old school thing.

You can do the same thing with the Multiple Bb fingerings. Although that one is a tad more cumbersome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
494 Posts
I copy lots of music into Finale (handwritten sheets and sets where the score has gone missing) and I have noted those symbols on drum sets (I think they mean "use open/closed hi-hats") and on "hat"-muted brass (o=no mute, +=mute on).
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top