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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
i have the chance to get my hands on an alto ny Meyer bros 5m. It plays very nice but tastes a little bit strange compared to the normal meyers. Does this have anything to do with the sulphur in the rubber? Is it toxic and will i risk my health by playing it regularly?
 

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You are probably tasting the rubber that it is made of.
 

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Some 'vintage' mouthpieces will have a sulfur taste after not being played for a few years. It's NOT toxic.
You can give it a bath using cool water and some toothpaste on a washcloth.
It will be minty fresh and not damaged in any way, shape, or form. :)
 

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Hi,
i have the chance to get my hands on an alto ny Meyer bros 5m. It plays very nice but tastes a little bit strange compared to the normal meyers. Does this have anything to do with the sulphur in the rubber? Is it toxic and will i risk my health by playing it regularly?
I had this exact same thing with an old Selmer soloist, i was starting to get quite a sour taste from it after a while and i could also smell it as well! after a bit of research i found out that the rubber was breaking down with age and the taste/smell was due to chemicals leaching from it, there was also talk of carcinogen's!
 

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You're not supposed to eat it^^
 

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Some clown probably got his hands on it before you.
One of the HR pieces I bought secondhand was obviously played by a smoker ( horrible taste ) .

It took ages of cleaning , and only antibacterial kitchen spray eventually got rid of the unwanted "flavour" - may be worth asking a seller if they smoke?



Blowhard2
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the advice. I never really would have thought about cleaning it before playing it after it was laying around somewhere in a shop undiscovered for years and having been covered in dust. Stupid me.
seriously: I've cleaned it before i've played on it and i've cleaned it now for a second time. The taste is now a little less disturbing.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Does anyone know why the EPA exactly prohibited the rubber production? Was it because the sulphur was dangerous to the player or to the workers in the production process?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks to all who replied. I'm now a proud owner of a 5m Meyer Bros NY Altomouthpiece (it is a real one, i did my research). It sounds great but tastes strange. And the best is the shopowner gave it to me for free because i've helped him out with my advice in several situations (I'm not sure whether he understood what this mouthpiece is worth altough i've tried to tell him about it.).
 

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If it has a slightly cloudy oxidized color, you can use a very mild abrasive to make it shiney black again. Silver polish should do it, but it requires a lot of work. Then you need to seal it, preferably with a food-grade wax. What we call parrafin in the U.S. should work, there's also the crap they put on apples, but carnuba wax is harder and lasts longer. Sometimes just polishing them down to the harder, non-oxidized rubber is enough.

Mark
 
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