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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, I'm playing on a 7* link NY with Royal 2.5's. I am having an issue with a spit sound I am getting from the piece, no matter how much I try to suck it out, the only way to fix it is to swab it every 5 minutes. I also have a Selmer S80 F opening which I don't have this problem. Is it worth sending it to a refacer or selling it?
 

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The rollover is too high above the plane of the tip rail.
It makes rollovers rapidly pool up moisture.

A well adjusted baffle sweats, it does not pool up.

Without digressing too far this is where machining often fails on rollovers. Its not a problem so much on low baffle pieces but rollovers are extremely sensitive. Thats one reason you see a lot of machined designs trying to phase out rollovers....but links still have them or it wouldnt be a link.

Aside from the wet sound poor rollovers cut into clarity and projection. It also adds resistance.
 

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Is it worth sending it to a refacer or selling it?
Having it adjusted is the best way to ensure that it is right.

If you instead sell it to buy another, there is every chance that the next one will have some problem as well.

Happiness is a well-adjusted mouthpiece.
 

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Wow! I always blamed the reed! After 20 years of trawlin' through SOTW, I still learn new things!
 

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Reeds take the blame for a lot of things that are not reed related. Reeds get a bad rap.

Just think of too high of a baffle acting like a dam when all that most air hits it.

...it turns immediately into pools/large droplets of water.

This is why real world play testing is critical.

I can count on one hand the makers in this world that can make a piece properly without play testing it....and even they take a gamble when it comes to what they consider an acceptable return/fail rate.

If your failure rate is aimed at zero the piece needs to be played...and that doesnt mean you hold a reed on it with your hand and blow to see if it makes sound (this is actually done by some makers who claim to play test...no lig, no neck, no horn.

Let me pose the question a different way: How many horn techs would you let overhaul and setup your horn if he told you he didnt need to play it once the job was done?
 

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I wondered about this as well. It only happens for me on certain mouthpieces. Thanks for the tips
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The “Bacon frying” sound.
Make sure your reed is lined up with the tip rail. That can help too.
I don't believe I can perfectly line up the reed, I will try and take more pictures later so I can explain, I think sending it off is the way to go.
 
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