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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone else visualize the notes as a colour ?

Not so much the notes when reading a piece of music, but rather when I'm thinking about an individual note, or key.
It's not something I've ever paid much attention to, but I do think of the main notes (flats or sharps don't seem to change anything) as having a specific coulour.

I always perceive :
C as Blue
D as Yellow
E as Blue
F as Brown
G as Green
A as Red
B as Orange

Just thought I'd throw it out there ... :mrgreen:

Also not sure why I think of C and E both as blue, that's just the way it is. :bluewink:
 

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Does anyone else visualize the notes as a colour ?

Not so much the notes when reading a piece of music, but rather when I'm thinking about an individual note, or key.
It's not something I've ever paid much attention to, but I do think of the main notes (flats or sharps don't seem to change anything) as having a specific coulour.

I always perceive :
C as Blue
D as Yellow
E as Blue
F as Brown
G as Green
A as Red
B as Orange

Just thought I'd throw it out there ... :mrgreen:

Also not sure why I think of C and E both as blue, that's just the way it is. :bluewink:
Is that in absolute pitch, or relative to whatever horn you are playing (sop vs bari)?

But to answer your question, "No."
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
synesthesia
I had to look that up .... but that's it exactly !! :)

"Synesthesia can involve any of the senses. The most common form, colored letters and numbers, occurs when someone always sees a certain color in response to a certain letter of the alphabet or number."

Is that in absolute pitch, or relative to whatever horn you are playing (sop vs bari)?
That never occurred to me. No, it's not pitch/tone dependent.
 

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That never occurred to me. No, it's not pitch/tone dependent.
So, you associate colors to the letter, not the sound then? Whether you play a C on the piano, or a C on the tenor sax, you think of Blue?

That's interesting! I associate numbers to colors, but that is only because I learned the color coding used on resistors in electronic circuits at an early age and that stuck in my mind: 0=black, 1=brown, 2=red, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
So, you associate colors to the letter, not the sound then? Whether you play a C on the piano, or a C on the tenor sax, you think of Blue?
That's right - the colour and the sound are not related at all.
An "A" is red no matter what.

If the tune is in A maj on the bari, I'll picture it as red .. the same tune on soprano will be yellow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
flats or sharps don't seem to change anything
Just to elaborate ... an Ab is red whilst a G# is green. :mrgreen:

This would be fascinating if I were an accomplished musician !! Could write a book .. :bluewink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Interesting. So are the blues ever, er, blue?
Sure .. if it's in C or E.

I'm sure this sounds bizarre to most people ... I was just hoping it was common enough that I wouldn't have to seek treatment !! :twisted:
 

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This seems like a very personal gift to experience music. Sometimes I wonder if two unrelated things that influence each other are reflecting a similar phenomenon, e.g. eating a meal while listening to a particular music influences the taste sensation.
 

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It is called Synesthesia , it is not uncommon and mostly women have that. It works with numbers and words too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia




The great late Oliver Saks spoke about this too



On music and the mind (at 37’ 45” on Synesthesia and many other things)

 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
it is not uncommon and mostly women have that
Well that might explain some other things !! :mrgreen: :bluewink: :mrgreen:

What I "experience" (which might be too strong a term) is nowhere near the intensity of the people in the video.
It's just a vague association - very ethereal.
Barely worth mentioning !

The Wikipedia article gives an example of another one that sort of applies to me too.
Whenever I think of what month it is and how it relates to some past or future event, I always picture the months laid out in an oval - with December at the top and July/Aug at the bottom. So right now we're coming down the left side of the egg !

C'mon ... everyone must do this one !! :mrgreen: :(
 

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I have been interested from and in the neuro-psychological aspects of music for a very long time.

Synesthesia, is one of those.
 

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I've always thought that synesthesia is really, really cool.

A couple of times back in the '70's I encountered some smoke with an aroma that was a very deep purple, but I don't think that counts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Now that I've been thinking about this for awhile, here's some clarification :

It's definitely the "key" that has the colour .. the letters of the alphabet have none. Nor do numbers or words (except words like blue or purple .. or chartreuse or periwinkle !!).
 

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It's quite fascinating, Brendan, though difficult for someone without synaesthesia to imagine. So if you hear two tones together, do the colours blend together and make a third colour--like, do C and D played together look green, and if so, does that remind you of G?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
No, nothing sounds like a colour to me.
Maybe it's like that for others.

I only imagine the key of D as yellow - nothing more.
When I hear a D, I wouldn't recognize it until I played it on the sax ... then I'd call it a B (alto/bari) and it would be orange !
 

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there are many forms of synesthesia, and by the way, this is not univocal so two synesthetic persons will not necessarily see the “ colors” (or smell smells or taste tastes ) the same way. I’ve ment people whom see words as colors and also numbers as colors.

Many synesthetic people have perfect pitch too but not all.
 

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All this talk about synesthesia 'seeing' notes as colors leads me to only one conclusion:

Psychedelics.
 
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