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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone:

I couldn’t figured out where to put this question, hope this is the right place. Do you know any way to name the notes when you are at solfedge? I mean how to name the C# of Cb when you are reading a score. I want to know if there is any standard for naming the altered notes. I ones heard that in german you can say ‘es’ or ‘is’ when finishing a note for naming the sharp of bemol (or something like that). It will be great to have that info in english, spanish and german :)

It will be great if you can help me, I downloaded many solfedge books, but cannot find any tip about this point.


Thanks,
Eduardo
 

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I think that you are asking two different questions one about the notes names in different languages and systems and one on solfeggio.

Here you find the different systems in different languages

https://web.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/names-keys-french-german-italian-and-spanish


click to expand!



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It is called Solfeggio or Solfege ( I suppose sof-edge was a typo but you wrote it twice in the title and text so maybe you are thinking that that is the word)

Originally (and still in Italy) the B note is pronounced Si despite the ( American & English pronunciation TI)

to find out why read here

https://www.quora.com/Why-do-Americans-pronounce-the-note-B-ti-instead-of-si-or-see


Meet Guido of Arezzo. Born around 991 or 992, he was a Benedictine monk and music theorist, who wanted a better way to teach songs to other monks. At the time musicians used hexachords, or sets of six pitches. Guido first described the Medieval Hexacord as a mnemonic device. He developed a system now known as the Guidonian Hand. Without falling down a medieval rabbit hole, let's just say that notes from the hexachords were mapped onto the fingers and joints of the hand. A teacher could point to a portion of the hand and the student would know to sing a certain pitch.

The notes needed names for this to work, so Guido used a hymn to John the Baptist known as Ut queant laxis. Each musical phrase starts at a successively higher note on the hexachord. Listen to the first syllable of each phrase:

UT queant laxis,REsonare fibris,MIra gestorum,FAmuli tuorum,SOLve polluti,LAbii reatum,Sancte Iohannes.

The Latin initials for Saint John (Sancte Iohannes) are S and I, thus SI was eventually assigned to the seventh note, a pitch that is not used in this hymn. Now Guido had UT, RE, MI, FA, SOL, LA, and a visual way, using a hand, to indicate which pitch to sing. Today musicians still learn a similar system known by the French word solfege which, like solfeggio, takes its name from the notes SOL and FA.

This alone might have cemented Guido's place in musical history, but he was far from done. He is credited as coming up with a way of marking notes on a 5-bar staff, which gave birth to the way we read music today. Guido of Arezzo is thus known as the father of musical notation.

Here's an interesting bit of etymology from the Guidonian Hand. It was a roughly three-octave system where the lowest note, what we now call G at the bottom of the bass clef, was known as gamma ut. As you may have guessed from the fact that these scales are called sol-fa, not fa-sol, they thought of scales as descending, as opposed to the way we learn them now as ascending pitches. When you arrived at the lowest note you had traversed the entire span of pitches. So the gamma ut, or gamut, came to mean the entire range.

Little could the original writer of Ut queant laxis, who may even have been Guido himself, have imagined the impact that his little hymn would have on both music and language over a thousand years after his death.

In the 1600s, an Italian musicologue named Giovanni Battista Doni suggested that UT be replaced with the open syllable DO. I think the fact that the first syllable of his last name happens to be DO is entirely a coincidence. But there we are with DO RE ME FA SOL LA SI.

We shift now to England in the early 1800s. Sarah Glover adapted the DO RE ME solfeggio into a sight reading system, changing SI into TI. Her Norwich Sol-fa is the scale many of us learned by singing along with Julie Andrews in The Sound of Music. Later, in the mid-19th century, Reverend John Curwen further refined Glover's system into a Tonic Sol-fa to aid in the sight reading of notated music on the staff.

Curwen had his own hand-based mnemonic. Rather than pointing to fingers and joints the way Guido of Arrezo did, he invented hand gestures to represent the notes. Rather fancifully, and perhaps inspiring today's Solfeggio Frequency woo-meisters, he had some interesting descriptions of the tones.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi all:

Sorry, I just was able to came back to the forum. Thanks for the explanations. Originally I was asking for how to name the notes when you are singing the notes. But it's always good to learn and correct the words in oder to be more accurate in the future.


Thanks a lot!
Eduardo
 
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