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I've acquired a metal clarinet which plays very nicely and is going to become my big band horn. I've just got one issue left to address - The barrel tenon is loose in the receiver on the body. It is a 2 piece model, 3 if you count the mouthpiece.

A single wrap of paper - 25# - is just right to allow it to hold it's position without moving while I play, and not seize up when I take it apart at the end of the night. I'd prefer to fix this properly and not keep wrapping it with paper.

Is there an appropriately sized sheet cork for this application or would some other material be better suited?
 

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Carl H. said:
I've acquired a metal clarinet which plays very nicely and is going to become my big band horn. I've just got one issue left to address - The barrel tenon is loose in the receiver on the body. It is a 2 piece model, 3 if you count the mouthpiece.

A single wrap of paper - 25# - is just right to allow it to hold it's position without moving while I play, and not seize up when I take it apart at the end of the night. I'd prefer to fix this properly and not keep wrapping it with paper.

Is there an appropriately sized sheet cork for this application or would some other material be better suited?

1/16 is the correct size sheet cork to use for clarinet tenons. If you want it a little thinner, you can use 1/64. You might have to sand either way to get a good fit. :)
 

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Silicone plumber's tape?

I've never tried this on a clarinet mouthpiece, but I wrap my saxophone neck cork with silicone tape when a mouthpiece fits on it too loosely. This white tape sticks to itself and to the neck cork quite well. It is pretty easy to get off, too. I wonder if this would work for your clarinet mouthpiece cork.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
bbarner said:
I've never tried this on a clarinet mouthpiece, but I wrap my saxophone neck cork with silicone tape when a mouthpiece fits on it too loosely. This white tape sticks to itself and to the neck cork quite well. It is pretty easy to get off, too. I wonder if this would work for your clarinet mouthpiece cork.
The mouthpiece cork is fine. I tried the tape, but it doesn't work well for this application. In fact paper works quite well, except for the fact that it is a soggy mess at the end of the night.

The fit between the "barrel", which is really a mouthpiece holder, and the body more closely resembles the tuning slide of a brass instrument than a standard clarinet tenon, but with a larger space between the 2 pieces. In theory it might be possible to expand the "tenon" to make a tighter fit, but there is a trace of adhesive residue left from some material being used as a friction fit/space filler on the tenon. I think some resistance is necessary so that the mouthpiece isn't moving when in use.

If there is a cork thin and strong enough to withstand the pull of being assembled and disassembled it would seem a logical application. I am concerned that cork that thin might tear apart if I should not have enough grease some night to allow it to easily be disassembled and put in the case.

Thus this post on a suitable material for this application.
 

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Carl H. said:
The mouthpiece cork is fine. I tried the tape, but it doesn't work well for this application. In fact paper works quite well, except for the fact that it is a soggy mess at the end of the night.

The fit between the "barrel", which is really a mouthpiece holder, and the body more closely resembles the tuning slide of a brass instrument than a standard clarinet tenon, but with a larger space between the 2 pieces. In theory it might be possible to expand the "tenon" to make a tighter fit, but there is a trace of adhesive residue left from some material being used as a friction fit/space filler on the tenon. I think some resistance is necessary so that the mouthpiece isn't moving when in use.

If there is a cork thin and strong enough to withstand the pull of being assembled and disassembled it would seem a logical application. I am concerned that cork that thin might tear apart if I should not have enough grease some night to allow it to easily be disassembled and put in the case.

Thus this post on a suitable material for this application.



Hey Look, You asked for CORK SIZES thats what I gave you.;) I think tape would peal and so forth and make using the horn more annoying. If you need a extra stick of cork grease, just in case, I will give you one.:D Assuming you buy my high quality sheet cork.;)


P.S. I know the cork grease is in stock! and it's BUFFET
 

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Simon Weiner said:
P.S. I know the cork grease is in stock! and it's BUFFET

(Yeah, but isn't that 440 grease, like the pencils were?!, I need some european 442 grease so my solos stand out!!):twisted:

I'm sure there is cork thin enough to fit, I'm more concerned with appropriateness for this application.
 

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Carl H. said:
(Yeah, but isn't that 440 grease, like the pencils were?!, I need some european 442 grease so my solos stand out!!):twisted:

I'm sure there is cork thin enough to fit, I'm more concerned with appropriateness for this application.


(sorry then it is 440. maybe you can do like a REMIX.)

You mean the mouthpiece holder is like a cup correct?
 

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Simon Weiner said:
(sorry then it is 440. maybe you can do like a REMIX.)

You mean the mouthpiece holder is like a cup correct?
It looks like an exaggerated brasswind mouthpiece. A cup for the mouthpiece to fit into, and a pipe that fits into the body/lead pipe.


Courtesy of ebay:


Very similar to this, but longer pipe.
 

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Carl H. said:
I'm sure there is cork thin enough to fit, I'm more concerned with appropriateness for this application.
I've recorked my metal Rauber/Selmer on the barrel using 1/64 cork. It will withstand the forces of assembling and disassembling, but you have to be very careful and accurate when glueing. Even with good contact cement I'd let it harden for a day with some paper tightly wound around it. Only then start - carefully again - sanding down.

Of course, good cork grease is a must once it's finished.
 

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I guess cork is used for this application. Never looked for these on ebay before, live and learn!
 

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Thanks Ben. How much sanding was required in your situation?
 

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Simon Weiner said:
Or Just Listen to Me More. ;)
The reverb from the helmet is hard to listen to sometimes. Maybe if I had some dark glasses?:D
 

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Carl H. said:
Thanks Ben. How much sanding was required in your situation?
Just enough. ;)

Difficult to remember - but I think it wasn't all that much. Of course, you can also try 1/32 cork, to be on the safe side; it might be a bit easier to glue (especially the overlap) but requires more sanding.

I used 200 grit paper, cut in stripes, wrapped the joint in bubble wrap and clamped it between my thighs, then started - carefully - shoe-shining the sand paper stripe over the cork, rotating the joint after every few strokes.
 

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How thick is #25 paper. If that is anything like ordinary paper, then cork is quite unsuitable for such a thin space.

If it is meant to have cork, then there will be a groove where the cork should be.

If it is like a flute where the metal surfaces are supposed to fit neatly together, then it is a job for a technician with specialised equipment, (which not all will have, especially if this is an unusual size of tubing.)
 

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Carl,

I have the same problem with my Pan American.

I currently have a few wraps of electric tape on it and this has been working well.

I don't have any cork here that I could sand down real thin without it disintegrating.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Checking with a caliper I find about 0.01 inch to 0.02 inch of size difference, the "barrel" being a good deal out of round. Maybe paper will be the final (affordable) solution?
 

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Carl-

I have a metal clarinet around here somewhere that I could send you the "barrel" of. It is also a two piece (three including mouthpiece), and I have come to realize that it just won't play well without an overhaul, and I am not willing to spend more 4 times what I paid for the thing to put it into playing condition when I have two perfectly good clarinets already.

I would be willing to even send you the whole thing, if the case weren't so ratty... It would NEVER survive shipping.

When I find the thing, I will measure it with a caliper or micrometer in multiple places, to make sure it is still "in round".
 

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Carl H. said:
Checking with a caliper I find about 0.01 inch to 0.02 inch of size difference, the "barrel" being a good deal out of round. Maybe paper will be the final (affordable) solution?
Difference where? In the groove of the to-be-corked part? Between the diameter at the tenon tip and the socket?
Before I did mine I could hardly believe that cork should do it, but it did:
http://test.woodwind.org/clarinet/BBoard/read.html?f=1&i=210824&t=210824
 

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Somebody mentioned silicon tape. You said you tried it. The appropriate stuff to try is plumbers' TEFLON tape. Is that what you tried?

The tenon being out of round won't help at all.
 
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