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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First let me say that I have been reading many of the posts and am very impressed by the knowledge shared in the forums.

A little over 10 years ago, I purchased my buescher as an upgrade to a selmer student model that got me through my marching band years. I have been fairly happy with it although, probably by fault of my own, I don't feel I have obtained a professional sound.

The serial number for my alto sax is 304220, underneath the number is a Buescher True Tone logo. On the front it has a very nice B engraved, with "The Buescher Aristocrat" followed by Elkhart, Ind U.S.A and what looks to be a diamond engraved below.

I appreciate this forums expertise and comments on the following questions.

1) Is this a model that any recording artists use today? If so, I'd like to listen to them for tone quality. I find the recordings of the birdman are not of modern quality and it is hard to discern his tonal qualities.

2) Is this considered a "desirable" Aristocrat or a model better left for students?

3) Does anyone have good or bad experiences using an Otto Link "Super" Tone Master gold plated mouthpiece with this horn? Is rubber the way to go?

4) I am proficient technically (scales and such), what do you recommend as the top 3-5 things to improve tonal quality? I am leaning toward taking lessons for this, but also thought there are plenty of people here that can advise me. Are listening and mimicing the only way to do improve? Thx.
 

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Oh dear - now you're out of excuses - that's Johnny Hodges' sax, a fine instrument when properly set up.

"I am leaning toward taking lessons for this" - top man, that is the thing to do.
 

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Mob: Welcome to SOTW. As Doug replied, yes it is a very nice example of Buescher's great saxophones. I have one of those among several vintage Bueschers - they are commonly called the Big B because of the engraving you described.

I use a variety of mouthpieces with it - it will handle any piece I can play.

If you have a particular artist in mind, then listen and emulate. I've always liked Johnny Hodges, so that is the sound I have in my head. Can't say I come close enough, but I keep trying. Once recordings went electronic, I believe they did capture the artists' true sound, even as old as early Bechet, Hodges, etc.

I suppose you could go on the Great Mouthpiece Quest - that may help you find a piece that helps you achieve the sound you want. I don't believe the mouthpiece material makes any difference - it is generally the interior design of the piece, the player's embouchure, and the characteristics of the chosen reed that creates the sound (helped of course by a well-designed saxophone). I prefer rubber, only because those are the ones that I play the best. DAVE
 

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Welcome, Mob. You are the owner of one of the finest saxophones ever made and a real classic beauty.

Listen to Johnny Hodges playing Isfahan about 100 times, find a tech who appreciates your horn and doesn't want to remove the snaps, and find a good teacher.

Or listen to whoever you really like 100 times and then do the rest. This horn is flexible enough you should be able to get just about any sound you want from it.
 

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Don't listen to them they Know nothing :twisted:
That is a really crappy horn I will give you $20.00 for it I am sure it will make a nice lamp:twisted: :twisted:

Oh and get some lessons;)


Saintsday isn't talking about me;) :!:
 

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Someone should warn you, Mob. There are a lot of Aussies on this board and even some Brits with senses of humor even more twisted than mine.:D

You can sometimes identify them by their being shift key challenged and confusing homonyms.:twisted:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the replies

I appreciate it all the posts, and as a result, have decided to fashion a new lamp post out of my big b. I'll post pics when I am done... NOT.

Last night I tried a claude lakey 7*3. Still not perfect, but it allowed for a much more open and edgy sound compared to my otto link, and gave me much more freedom, the otto link I have is restrictive in comparison. The important thing to know is that the horn should perform. I just have to figure out how to get it there.

Thanks!!
 

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Practice you're overtones!!! That and long even (tonally and sound level) are the best ways to improve your tone, period.

For what it's worth, I don't know of too many folks that play an STM on alto. I had one myself and it really sucked (the tenors can be great though!).

A meyer hard rubber (modern, unless you have $1000 lying around) would be a good base to start with. They are easy to blow, and have a sort of even across the board sound, allowing you to shape it.

Is your horn is good mechanical condition? Any piece may sound bad if the pads are bad, air leaks/ etc. Letting a tech give it the once over might be a good idea.
 
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