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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

Please help me.

This is about the chord progression of the bridge part of rhythm change.
(Alto key : B7 B7 E7 E7 A7 A7 D7 D7)

In my vague memory, I remember the guitarist Herb Ellis called this one "Cook a robin" or something like that.
Does the nickname of this change exist ?

Thanks in advance
 

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'Rhythm Bridge'
 

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Here in Australia we always refer to progressions that follow the cycle of 5ths as going "around the clock". Imagine C as being 12 o'clock; the cycle of 5ths, each of which tends to resolve into the next one clockwise around the dial, goes like this:
..............C
.........G ........F
.....D................Bb
..A......................Eb
.....E.................Ab
..........B.........D
...............Gb

So if youre explaining a 'I Got Rhythm' to someone who hasn't played it before you might say something like "It's basically a 32 bar AABA in Bb but with a 4 bar tag which we play every time (or don't play as applicable). The A theme is based on I, VI, II, V and the bridge goes around the clock from D7."

If you've got time before the tune starts you might explain that the last 4 bars of the A go I, I7, IV, IVm, I, V7, I; but that's a progression that anyone should be able to hear.


As for other tune types, in traditional jazz bands we talk of blues, minor blues, rag (classic like Scott Joplin, long rag like 'Bill Bailey', short rag like 'Saints Go Marching In'), stomp (where the tune starts on V7 like 'South' or 'Sister Kate'.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you very much.

I think I can understand "around the clock" concept.

If the second and fourth chord of "Rhythm Bridge" are substituted like D7D7Db7Db7C7C7B7B7, it is explained "chromatically down from D7" ?


As I am Japanese, I am curious to know in what way these changes are usually explained in English among players.
 

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Someone will know this:

According to jazz lore: the most common bridge chord progressions were "I Got Rhythm" and "Honeysuckle Rose". One was referred to as Sears Roebuck and the other as Montgomery Wards.

I never figured out which was which!

Anyone?
 

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Someone will know this:

According to jazz lore: the most common bridge chord progressions were "I Got Rhythm" and "Honeysuckle Rose". One was referred to as Sears Roebuck and the other as Montgomery Wards.

I never figured out which was which!

Anyone?
Honey suckle Rose is I7 IV II7 V7 or variants

Rhythm is as mentioned II7, Vi7, I7 V7 cycle of fifths of dominants

The New Guide to Harmony with Lego Bricks

http://www.amazon.co.uk/New-Guide-Harmony-Lego-Bricks/dp/0951579533

I think to be fair a lot of the nicknames there are ones that Mr Cork made up rather than being in common usage (??)
I don't think there are any in common useage apart from the two mentioned.

(Well, Rhythm Changes for the whole form, not just the Bridge, and Blues changes)

Otherwise you might just quote any set of changes from a specific song.
 

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…the guitarist Herb Ellis called this one "Cook a Robin" or something like that.
Maybe he was referring to a tune called Robin's Nest. That was a very popular tune in the bebop era although not so many play it today. Robin's Nest is in the key of Db. The bridge is:

F7/// //// Bb7/// //// Eb7/// //// Ab7/// //// - (Db)
 

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In my vague memory, I remember the guitarist Herb Ellis called this one "Cook a robin" or something like that.
Does the nickname of this change exist ?
It doesn't seem to me to be completely beyond the bounds of possibility that some of the boppers may have (or may have had) ways of referring to "hybrid" changes that are a kind of shorthand eg rather than say F blues with a rhythm bridge say "Fithum". (that's just a stupid example i made up but you get the principle).

"According to jazz lore: the most common bridge chord progressions were "I Got Rhythm" and "Honeysuckle Rose". One was referred to as Sears Roebuck and the other as Montgomery Wards." (ThreeSixTwoFive @#6)

I have never ever heard of that but if that is true who's to say there aren't others?
 

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Maybe he was referring to a tune called Robin's Nest. That was a very popular tune in the bebop era although not so many play it today. Robin's Nest is in the key of Db. The bridge is:

F7/// //// Bb7/// //// Eb7/// //// Ab7/// //// - (Db)
...That's the 'Rhythm Bridge'. Better to learn this bridge and it's variants and substitutions ('Locomotion', 'Stompin at the Savoy') in a hurry. You'll definitely hear it a lot.

The bridge to 'Honesuckle Rose', 'Take the A Train', 'Satin Doll', 'Jumpin at the Woodside', 'Sunny Side of the Street', et al is another common 'bridge' to get under your fingers and in your ears.

...and learn 'Cherokee'.
 

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Maybe he was referring to a tune called Robin's Nest. That was a very popular tune in the bebop era although not so many play it today. Robin's Nest is in the key of Db. The bridge is:

F7/// //// Bb7/// //// Eb7/// //// Ab7/// //// - (Db)
Good answer.

When I used to play gigs and someone would request a tune, the piano player occasionally couldn't remember the bridge. When that happened he would automatically go into our utility bridge called "Melancholy Bridge" in that key. I don't remember the changes, but the dance audience never seemed to know the difference.

When someone requested a song he didn't know he would answer, "We don't know that one, but we'll play a song with a lot of the same notes in it". The person who made the request would say thanks and walk away none the wiser.
 

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Someone will know this:

According to jazz lore: the most common bridge chord progressions were "I Got Rhythm" and "Honeysuckle Rose". One was referred to as Sears Roebuck and the other as Montgomery Wards.

I never figured out which was which!

Anyone?
Yes! I remember Rich Matteson and Jack Petersen talking about the Sears & Roebuck bridge and the Montgomery Ward bridge. And I remember that they were referring to the Rhythm and Honeysuckle bridges. But, sadly, I don't remember which bridge got which nickname.

Edit to add explanation: For our younger readers and those living outside the U.S., Sears & Roebuck (now just Sears) and Montgomery Ward (now long gone) are the names of two large department store chains. The idea is that in the 1920's-1940's there were lots of tunes written that used one of those two very common bridges. So if you were on a gig and someone called a tune you didn't know, they could just say, "It's in Ab with the Montgomery Ward bridge."

Of course, they could have just as easily said, "It's in Ab, with the Honeysuckle (or Rhythm) bridge, but I guess musicians just like to have jargon like people do in every profession.
 

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Thanks Mikio for this amusing question. It made me just a little bit wiser (or did it just add another piece of tasty junk info in my already cluttered brain?..)

I found this excellent read:

http://www.scribd.com/doc/7120999/Jazz-Theory-Advanced

A quote:
Figure 5-A displays the chords of the Honeysuckle Rose bridge, figure 5-B those of I Got Rhythm.

The two "classic bridges" shown in figures 5-A and 5- B are so common that musicians of the 1940's gave them nicknames, calling 5-A the "Montgomery Ward Bridge," and 5- B the "Sears Roebuck Bridge!"
Obviously the musicians of the day regarded each of those two types of bridges to be so common that each was tantamount to a "cliche," hence the humorous nicknames imply an "off-the-rack" mindset on the part of the composer. The terms have all but disappeared from the vocabulary of musicians, but as no new names have been invented to replace the old ones, we will exercise the right to continue using them here.
Reine
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thank you very much for the help from members.
A little question gave a lot to me.

Now I have to go back to practice.
The tune is "Star Eyes". It has a bit complicated change and is 36 bars(sigh). It is very difficult for me who started playing alto 3 years ago.

Let me thank you again.
 

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I don't know if it's a nickname, but I'd call that bridge a 'cycle of dominants' since it follows the cycle of fourths.
 

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One man's fourth is another's fifth. I've always heard of it being called the cycle of 5ths because the chord you are playing, say F7, is the dominant chord (5th) of the chord you are resolving to, in this case Bb. But the opposite view is equally valid, that is that F7 resolves up a perfect 4th to Bb. I guess it's one of those glass half full or half empty things.
 

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Maybe he was referring to a tune called Robin's Nest. That was a very popular tune in the bebop era although not so many play it today. Robin's Nest is in the key of Db. The bridge is:

F7/// //// Bb7/// //// Eb7/// //// Ab7/// //// - (Db)

Not familiar with this tune at all! Can you recommend a recording?


Also - just to be clear, the Honeysuckle bridge & the I Got Rhythm bridge are identical. I don't think that was made quite clear in above posts.
 

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Also - just to be clear, the Honeysuckle bridge & the I Got Rhythm bridge are identical. I don't think that was made quite clear in above posts.
Really? I've always played them differently. If we put them both in Bb they'd go:

Rhythm
D7/// //// G7/// //// C7/// //// F7/// ////

Honeysuckle
Bb7/// //// Eb/// //// C7/// //// F7/// ////
 
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