Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Forum Contributor 2011-2015
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,526 Posts
If it is set-up well then it will be a fine backup.

My Kessler Custom Tenor does just what I need it to do: waits in the corner to be played and when it's time to be played, it plays.

These are nice playing saxes. You got it at a great price.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011-2015
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I did receive the Kessler yesterday. As is the norm for an eBay purchase, it was not as described. It did not want to play below a G very well. It had a bad case of "dust bunnies" all over the horn, especially the springs. The neck octave pad is torn and the pip hole had a sharp edge on it that I am sure caused the pad tear. I went through and cleaned some serious "gunk" off several pads and finally got it playing fairly well except for low C and below. Seems to have leaks somewhere. I did tape up the neck octave pip while I was testing the lower register. It also looks like the pad between the G# and low F has been replaced with an improper size pad. The ergos are pretty good and compare well to my Super 20. It would take some getting used to the offset keys as my Super 20 toneholes/keys are all on the same plane. According to the Kessler site, this looks like their Custom Standard Series tenor. They sell it new for $925. My question now is, do I just list it for sell with an honest description to try and recoup some of my money or throw good money after bad and try to get it into good playing condition? I know I have said it before and I did not follow my own advise.... no more eBay sax purchases.... :tsk:
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,444 Posts
Standard rule of thumb for eBay purchases of saxes seem to be to expect to pay $100-$200 to make the horn work after you receive it. Sounds about right in your case for a good set up with some pad replacement and de-burr of ht octave pip. So, I dunno, whether or not it's worth it is your call.

My Kessler tenor has cost me all of $100 over the last four years for somewhat yearly maintenance to keep it tip-top, if that helps any. Good luck in your decision!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Saxus Envious Curmudgeon
Joined
·
3,860 Posts
Considering what you paid, drop 2 bills in it and get it up to playing condition. Play it as a back up until you find a beginner who needs it and then sell locally. It takes longer that way, but you will most likely get more money back that way.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011-2015
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I have decided to do just that Randall. I frequently have to travel out of town for several days on business and it would be nice to have a "throw down" to take to keep up my practice without risking someone stealing my Super 20 out of my vehicle. I can always replace it if stolen, no way I can replace a Super 20 that I purchased new 43 years ago.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2008
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
If you have a repairman close to you (something not everybody has) I would at least inquire how much it takes to have it in good playing shape. Leak fixes are generally cheap and also pads replacement. You might end up with a 50$ fix...
I think this horn will be very hard to sell and, in current shape, might be next to impossible. But you got it for cheap so if you have it fixed for other few peanuts it might end up being a very good buy for backup usage.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011-2015
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
No close techs. I have been in contact with one about 90 miles away and will get him to look at it to let me know what it will take. I did not originally purchase it to resell only to use as a backup. Also, my son used to play sax so I was hoping to get him back interested in playing if I had one he could use. :)
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
5,444 Posts
Looks like you bought it from some one who is an SOTW member. Perhaps, if you email him, you might get some money back if you explain what is required to get it up to the description and how much it will cost. It never hurts to ask! And send detailed pics to show the discrepancies between actual condition and description, if at all possible.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Contributor 2010
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
The seller's description and your description sure are different! I would definitely ask him to help get it into playable shape (since that is what his description claimed).
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2010
Joined
·
3,310 Posts
The dust bunnies are clear to see in Quins pictures arent they? Say what you like about him, but his pictures are always exemplary, clear and comprehensive.

Mind you, I dont think the OP is the first person to find a discrepancy between their expectations of playable and the sellers, but if you can play a low Bb then its playable, even if its not perhaps optimally set up, and to be fair, shipping horns can knock things out of adjustment anyway. On the other hand sometimes it can just take a little time to get used to a horn before it will speak easily low down too.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011-2015
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Well, none of this is "life altering" so I consider it a minor inconvenience and move on. Not really a big deal. I am not trying to trash the seller, just dissapointed in the description. If the description had stated the pads were covered in green gunk, some where torn, one had been replaced with an improper size, some corks are missing then I probably would not have purchased it for that price. In the end I hope to wind up with a playable tenor with modern ergos. That last point is the main reason for not keeping my Cleveland tenor I had. Just could not get used to the LH Bb key placement. :)
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011-2015
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
The tech sent me an email with this information:

You were right, the rods, keys, and the body were extremely caked up with old oil and dust. We looked at the neck and neck receiver issue. We can tighten it up some, but unfortunately the other repairman sawed the tightening slot out so the neck could tighten down further; he tried to fit the neck with an older style tool and marred up the tenon. We will make it match up as well as possible without having to replace the tenon and receiver.
They also advised a couple of posts were out of alignment as well. I told them to go ahead and do a complete recondition. I figured I might as well see how well it plays when I get it back and decide what to do at that point. I could have purchased a new one from Kessler at this point. Oh well, it's only money and besides, I am curious to see the quality of work. I may have found someone "almost close" I can use in the future. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
What am I missing here? The horn was advertised as playable and nothing wrong with it? Why would you pay to have a
ton of work done to it? Why didn't you just send it back? Makes no sense, your doing a total overhaul on a horn that has no resale value?
 

·
Forum Contributor 2011-2015
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
You are absolutely correct in your reasoning.... but it is all water under the bridge at this point. Saxophones are just a hobby, not my life so... sometimes my judgement on things related to them are not the most "enlightened". No point in belaboring the issue, I have moved past it.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top