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Does this mean that you feel a slight lag in the notes sounding? Or does it just mean that you have to adjust your style to firmly press the keys down?
I don't think there's a lag, but no lapse of precision is tolerated by the switches. Anything other than exact fingering at any speed can cause audible blips. I personally do not feel this is a big deal, but it is sometjing you have to get used to.
 

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... no lapse of precision is tolerated by the switches. Anything other than exact fingering at any speed can cause audible blips.
Same is true on my Akai EWI Solo even though there are no keys/switches to press down; the "keys" are just contacts. But you can't be sloppy in your fingering as you can on a real sax; you have to be precise or you get notes you didn't want. It makes me appreciate playing my tenor and especially my bari where I can get around pretty fast but I don't have to be careful about touching or releasing keys. You're just working mechanics to help get the notes out, but the notes are in you and the mouthpiece and reed and the tube of the horn, not in the digital switches. I hope that makes sense.
 
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Ditto for the WX5. Your fingering has to be precise or you get short notes you don't want. I don't have a problem with that but I did when I first got my new WX7 so many internet centuries ago.
 

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Same for my Aerophone AE-10 but less so because you have to press keys down. Mainly it happens over the octave break because you have to precisely time your thumb movement up or down on the octave key to not get an unwanted octave jump in the note you're intending. But it's better than the octave rollers on the EWI. Also on the EWI, the octave rollers are right next to the glide plate. I've had to learn to keep my thumb over to the left to keep from accidentally touching the glide strip and getting all kinds of unpredictable sounds. Years of sax makes my thumb gravitate to the center of the octave rollers and directly behind my fingers on the front, which is something I've having to unlearn on the EWI.
 
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I find the octave key on the YDS-150 to be harder to master than on a saxophone, too. It was more complicated on the WX5, but had the advantage of giving the added range. I still wonder why Yamaha didn't make the A key into a lower octave key. That'd be more useful than the A, but I guess if you're a bari player, you want the A key?
 

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Same problem with the app - P10 lite
Have you tried look at the bluetooth settings on the phone to know if the phone "sees" the YDS-150 bluetooth? Or can you not get the bluetooth led on the YDS blinking, waiting to pair?
 

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The app doesn't do anything, no matter where you tap on the screen?
 

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Yes, I'm preparing the piece for publication on Thingiverse.
As soon as done I will post the link
Good morning Vadda. Have you already prepared the publication of this excellent piece ? If you do not mind, I would like you to share your print file design in order to make my own piece. Thanks in advance. Kind regards
 

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Yep, this is in no way a saxophone, any more than a Keystation MIDI keyboard is a piano. But it does fell very much like one. I believe it can help a lot for accuracy and coordination, too.

I haven't read all the above comments so I don't know if it's been mentioned. I am still writing my review. Some complain about lack of MIDI.

The YDS-150 does output MIDI via USB despite no mention in the manual!

Further, the MIDI is clean. My Roland Guitar Synth outputs a very dirty MIDI signal, due to the constant "bend" thing. The YDS-150 only bends when you tell it to with the analog controller.

USB also outputs dry audio.

Agreed, I have had one two weeks. It sounds like a small keyboard. But in the hand it feels like a sax and you can practice licks, patterns, melodies, etc in ways that will transfer to a real horn. I tend to use it for few hours in the evening when normally it would not be possible to make noise. I am really pleased I got this, more so than I had anticipated. I had assumed it would just be for travel when in hotels, but I am sitting with it every evening - still getting a few hours on the actual horn earlier.
 

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I need to ask a question before I go ahead a pre-order the YDS 150. Do yo need amplification to play in a small venue of let say 20 people? or does the sound coming out of the speakers is just as miniscule as the Roland Ae-10?
 

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I don't have a YDS 150 but in all the demo videos I've seen I see a cable running out from the YDS to something so I don't think you're hearing the live sound of just the YDS speaker. I have an Aerophone AE-10 and an Akai EWI Solo. Both have internal speakers. When I've played each one in a live setting, in small club jams with the AE-10 or with just the other 4 members of my band in my garage with the EWI, I needed to put these electronic instruments through powered speakers in order to be heard. I bet the same is true for the YDS. It's being marketed as a practice instrument, not as a live performance instrument.
 
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The gentleman in the video below plays it without using an audio output cable and (apparently) without adjusting the recording levels from his speaking voice, so it should give you some sense of how loud it sounds on its own.

 

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Thanks for that video link, mmichel. I hadn't seen that one before. It really helps give an objective idea of how the instrument looks, sounds, and plays. I hear some key click, which is a complaint that some people have about the Aerophone AE-10. Also, I think if you're playing with other musicians –– drums, bass, guitar or keyboard – I think you're going to need some additional amplification.
 

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The answer depends on two factors. The acoustics of the room and the volume density of the external sounds.
Playing solo with no extraneous noises (traffic, busy café service, talking), the volume would probably be sufficient. You could certainly play solo or with acoustic guitar in a living room full of people.
With one other musician, say acoustic guitar, probably ok. Piano, not sure, it would need to be relatively soft.
With a rhythm section, probably not, again, unless everyone was playing soft.
Outdoors, maybe solo. I haven't tried playing at full volume, but I will now out of curiosity. I was planning on using an amp with a wireless connection.You can get a transmitter-receiver pair for under $50 for guitar that will work fine with the YDS-150.
 

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Those who own a YDS-150, the app was updated yesterday (19 Nov 2020)
 
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