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Bravo! I really enjoyed this short piece. Structurally, it reminds me a bit of the second section of the Desenclos "Prelude, Cadence et Finale." I liked the way you worked the extended techniques into the musical fabric of the composition, instead of highlighting them as long sections of "funny sounds and honks," as sometimes occurs, unfortunately.

I could imagine using those arpeggio sequences as exercises as well. :)

A few questions:

Who is Michael Hanna? I've never heard of him, but he's clearly a very good player.

You have specific chords indicated for the multiphonics. Are these guesses or approximations, or have you analyzed the sounds and identified the indicated notes among the overlapping tones?

What does the direction "bisb." mean (end of page 2 of the score)? It sounds like a trill using the bis key.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hey LostConn, thank you! Glad you enjoyed the piece!

Michael Hanna was a former graduate assistant at Central Michigan University. The two of us just graduated with our master's degrees last month (his in saxophone performance, mine in composition).

I'm not a saxophonist, so the multiphonic notation was mostly decided by Michael. To my knowledge, they are produced by fingering the lowest note of the notated chord. The upper two pitches sound within the multiphonic.

The "bisb." notation is a bisbigliando, or timbre trill. This is produced by trilling on alternative fingerings of the same pitch.
 

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This is a really neat piece that I'm going to have to pick up and start shedding. If I'm interpreting LostConn's reference to advanced techniques, then I agree with him completely. I especially like the use of multiphonics within moving phrases that go by almost fast enough that the listener is like, "wait, what was that?" A lot of composers are somewhat ham-fisted in their approach to multiphonics, but this is more nuanced. Very nice!

What is the little symbol at the start of measures 3, 21, and throughout the "C" section that sort of looks like the power button on electronic devices?
 

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Hey Eulipion2, good question! That's the symbol I use for slap tongue. Looking back on it, I should've specified that in the score, so thanks for pointing that out!

Glad you like the piece! I agree, I think extended techniques can overstay their welcome pretty quickly, so I wanted to use them to enhance what I already had instead of being the majority of the musical material.
 
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