Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I've been playing jazz/swing guitar for about three years now and I've decided to pick up clarinet to bring into what I'm already playing. I'm theory/scale/tune savvy. Reading isn't a problem either. I took a few lessons from a local classical clarinetist to get me started, but he really wasn't too sure what to tell me jazzwise other than practice scales. For someone who's pretty jazz literate what would you guys suggest would be a good course of study over the next year or 2. Right now I've been working through just learning some heads to different tunes and some exercises out of the Klose method book. I've done a little transcribing of easier tunes, but for all purposes I'm still getting to know the instrument. Any helpful tips would be much appreciated!
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,429 Posts
Scales! Arpeggios! When you can play all the scales and chords, then you can tackle melodies and harmonies. Jazz comes from within, not out of a book. Welcome to SOTW, by the way. DAVE
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2009
Joined
·
7,919 Posts
Since you already know jazz I suggest you focus on technique for a while. Like Dave said, scales and arpeggios in all forms and inversions. You'll need it. Get a copy of the Charlie Parker Omnibook. It's fun and great stuff to practice.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW member/, Official SOTW Sister
Joined
·
19,558 Posts
Technique, technique, technique.
The better your 'classical' technique, the better your 'jazz' technique.
Scales, arpeggios, fingerings, ESPECIALLY alternate fingerings. When you get into a 'bad' key for clarinet those alternates will come in more than a little handy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,226 Posts
Technical stuff done with a metronome, at 60. Exposes all flaws, thus showing you where you need work. Also does wonders for time feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
David Hite's Foundation Studies come in both the Clarinet and Saxophone "flavors." He also has edited Melodious and Progressive Studies for clarinets and saxophones. They are great "little books;" however I've been working on the Sax series and in the past 6 weeks are only proficient on 2 of the studies based on scales and 1 based on arpeggios. I've only been playing for 8 mos total so I'm a real late bloomer. I will also say that you can then take the studies, and once memorized, play around with them using swing notes and other jazz rhythms. That for me is the fun and the challange.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top