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Discussion Starter #1
the notes in question are high G, G# and middle D, the rest of the horn is soooo nice. Those notes just keep splitting and producing the the note an octave below. Is this something i need to adjust to or do i need to get the horn professionally setup? If i need to get the horn setup what does that entail?
 

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Check to make sure the body octave mechanism/pad is functioning properly. And yeah, new Selmers generally need set-ups, which is usually a check-up by a tech that can run from twenty to a hundred bucks depending upon what is needed and who you go to.
 

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Occasionally, there is a small amount of excess plating left in the first octave pip which can affect the G & G# - not saying this is definitely your problem, you may just need to re-adjust your air stream and 'voicing' for this new horn. But Grumps is right, take it to a tech and get it checked out nonetheless. I do still find that occasionally the G2 and G#2 can be a little 'croaky', even after owning my S3 tenor for 12 years.
 

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Yes, have it checked by a tech.
If the horn's OK you'll know you have to adjust to the horn.

But it's a great horn, so have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
yeah i originally thought it may be voicings to, but if i play those notes up the octave with the octave key they're fine. Guess it's a trip to the tech for me then... I may check it with my teacher first though, just to see what he thinks of it.
 

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Had this same problem with a brand new Series II alto 10+ years ago. Sent it back to Selmer they kept it for 5 months and sent it back in the same condition. I managed to get a phone number for their service dept here in USA and the lead tech told me my horn was "within spec" but then admitted many pros were having the body octave pips drilled out for this issue. It may not be the same thing but it sure sounds like it from your description. There were many threads on it here at SOTW from late 90's through a few years back.

Loved the way that Series II sounded once the vent was drilled but after the lefthand thumb rest fell off, several pads, corks, and felts, fell out and springs were constantly popping (always 15 minutes before a gig) I finally gave up on it. Sometimes I wish I had kept it but the ergos weren't great for me and at the time I was too proud to believe that a brand new $3000 horn basically needed $250 worth of setup work.
 

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Sometimes you'll find polishing compound blocking or constricting the 8ve vents on them which hasn't been cleared out.
 

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yeah i originally thought it may be voicings to, but if i play those notes up the octave with the octave key they're fine. Guess it's a trip to the tech for me then... I may check it with my teacher first though, just to see what he thinks of it.
Do you mean play those notes in the upper octave without the octave key just voicing them and they are ok?

The way I understand the acoustics of what is happening on your saxophone from my studies is that the position of the body octave vent is set for the note F natural as a compromise position. Both D and G# at 3 half steps away are the farthest from this ideal position which is 1/4 the wavelength of F. [The length of the standing wave is equal to 2X the length of the instrument to the first open tonehole.] Benade writes that the purpose of the octave vent at louder playing levels is to sufficiently shift the first mode frequency relative to that of the second mode so that their cooperation becomes impossible. In layman's terms opening the octave key needs to screw up the fundamental pitch so that only the octave above is sounded.

Apparently on your series 3 the dimensions of the body octave vent are not sufficient to produce the desired effect. I had a Cannonball sax come into the shop where I worked that was presenting the same problem on high G and G# when played loudly. I called the Cannonball company and they suggested that I take a small rat tail file and open up the bottom of the body octave vent tube a bit, leaving the top opening the same---essentially giving the tube a more conical shape. It solved the problem on that particular make and model. I am just giving this as an example. I have not tried this on a Selmer Series 3 so I can't say whether it would work or not. I do know that radically changing the diameter of octave vent tubes can have negative consequences as well such as creating intonation problems. Good luck with that. I hope your tech can find a solution that works.
 
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