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I had the chance to play a Selmer Axos alto saxophone. It is supposed to be the economical options for players with a budget. The store representative told me that it was so that more people can play Selmer and pay a reasonable price.

I tested this saxophone alongside Yamaha YAS-62 as they were about the same price range. 200$ diff. The Yamaha wins with the brighter tone and better response. The keyworks on the Yamaha was way better than the Axos. The palm keys was awkwardly placed. The high notes didnt speak to me as well as the Yamaha. The intonation was better with the Yamaha using two different tuners

Anyone else tried and had a different experience?

I tried this horn at Lucerne, Switzerland. A shop called Musik Hug in old town Lucerne.
 

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There are two threads on this topic in the Selmer Paris subforum. One is about the Axos itself: Interesting Selmer Seles Axos. The other is about SeleS in general, but includes a recent report on test-playing the Axos: Selmer launch new brand SeleS.

The Europe-USA Axos price differential seems considerable. In Europe, the Axos costs a bit more than the YAS-62. In the United States, the Axos costs a bit more than the YAS-875 & 82Z.
 

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This is a quote from Jim at Sax.co.uk
"Having had a blow on the Seles Axos this afternoon, I have to say that I’m very impressed with it. For me, it has a medium resistance, typical of Selmer saxes in general – this sax will be heavily compared with YAS62 and AW01 as it’s in the same price bracket, and having played a few phrases on all three back to back you really notice that the two Japanese models have a lot more ‘pop’ and ‘ripeness’ to the sound, generally their sound is very immediate. The Axos has a little more resistance, and as a result that iconic ‘Selmer sound’ comes out – having compared it to both Series II and III you can hear the difference, although to me it’s much closer to a Series II, but perhaps without the same drive and absolute fullness, however, it’s very close. My immediate reaction was that I felt like I was playing on a Selmer Paris saxophone, but for only two thirds the price, which is really impressive! They have managed to retain that depth of tone and lushness that you associate with French Selmer".

Jim- sax.co.uk
 

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I must say that I wish Sax.co.uk had an outlet in the United States, preferably near me. What an unbelievable selection of instruments! Their prices don't seem to be quite as good as those advertised by the continental European stores, but that may just be attributable to the strength of the pound against the euro.

My easy-to-make prediction is that the Axos will be a bigger hit in Europe than in North America. It just makes more sense as a consumer choice when priced at the YAS-62/AWO1 level than at the 875EX/AWO10 level. Plus, here the Axos is about three-fourths of the price of a new Series II, not two-thirds, and the used market for the Series II is very strong.
 

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Sax.co.uk are great to deal with both instore and online. I only have great things to say about them.
Maybe I'm wrong but I think their prices are better than many in Europe.
For the UK players I know buying on the UK market is more expensive than the US but about the same as Europe I think. UK's HM Customs are notoriously good at finding every saxophone that gets delivered from outside the EU into the UK and charging import duties to the recepient so some of the people I know make the trip over to the US to search for their sax at some of the well known and not so well known stores. You're right though sax.co.uk has a great range of saxes. They really seem to own the market in the UK.
 

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I tried one at the Symposium earlier this month. I've already commented on the other Seles threads, but probably should have come to this one first. Though it didn't have as substantial a feel as the II, III and Reference altos right next to it, it had a rather nice modern flavor to its sound that I actually preferred to the top of the line Selmers.
 

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I tried one at the Symposium earlier this month. I've already commented on the other Seles threads, but probably should have come to this one first. Though it didn't have as substantial a feel as the II, III and Reference altos right next to it, it had a rather nice modern flavor to its sound that I actually preferred to the top of the line Selmers.
By "substantial feel", do you mean the horn's overall weight, or are you referring to that overall flex in the keywork associated with softer alloys?
 

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Interesting. Hopefully, we can get a write up from a tech that has gone through the horn. Light and a little flex aren't necessarily bad attributes as long as the keys are not bending out of shape after hard playing. Most VI's, as well as the YAS-23, are light horns, but are quite durable. Stephen Howard also discussed key flex in his Bauhaus Walstein alto review.
 

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Light and a little flex aren't necessarily bad attributes as long as the keys are not bending out of shape after hard playing.
Quite possibly it was more pronounced for me as I picked up the Seles last after handling about a group of II, III and Reference altos. My impressions were relative in that regard.
 

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I tried the Axos next to several Selmers (including my own) at NASA 2016. I like it a lot, I found it to play very similar to the Series II altos but just slightly more bright and focused. Build quality was not a problem, although the horn is definitely a little lighter feeling than the other Selmers. Keywork feels quite good and solid in the hands, taking notes from both the Series II and III horns in terms of ergonomics. I'd say that this horn could do 9/10 of what the other horns could do, which is more than enough for most music education majors and advanced high school students. If you're after the Selmer thing, have to buy something new, and can't afford the other Selmers, this looks like a great choice.
 

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Have Axos serial numbers been inserted into the main sequence of Selmer Paris serial numbers, or has a new sequence been started for SeleS instruments?
 

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This is a quote from Jim at Sax.co.uk
"Having had a blow on the Seles Axos this afternoon, I have to say that I’m very impressed with it. For me, it has a medium resistance, typical of Selmer saxes in general – this sax will be heavily compared with YAS62 and AW01 as it’s in the same price bracket, and having played a few phrases on all three back to back you really notice that the two Japanese models have a lot more ‘pop’ and ‘ripeness’ to the sound, generally their sound is very immediate. The Axos has a little more resistance, and as a result that iconic ‘Selmer sound’ comes out – having compared it to both Series II and III you can hear the difference, although to me it’s much closer to a Series II, but perhaps without the same drive and absolute fullness, however, it’s very close. My immediate reaction was that I felt like I was playing on a Selmer Paris saxophone, but for only two thirds the price, which is really impressive! They have managed to retain that depth of tone and lushness that you associate with French Selmer".

Jim- sax.co.uk
I'd have to agree with this assessment. The Axos is a typical Selmer horn as far as tone and feel is concerned. It's definitely not a lesser horn; quite the contrary. It has a wonderful focused core, with a strong resonance in the low-mid and medium frequencies (more so than my early Mark VII). As for resistance, I find actually easier to play than my Mark VII, and it's considerably more in tune!
 

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For 4k, it surly better not be a lesser horn. Will be interesting to see if this is the future of Selmer manufacturing. I personally wouldn't mind if they go to a more machined process like Yamaha, as long as the quality is sound. Hey, they have to compete with the rest of the industry too.
 

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It has a wonderful focused core, with a strong resonance in the low-mid and medium frequencies (more so than my early Mark VII). As for resistance, I find actually easier to play than my Mark VII, and it's considerably more in tune!
Kind of like my Tiawanese-made Viking M60?:bluewink2: Seriously...from an old ex-Selmer guy. I don't see this price point working in today's market, but I could be wrong. The playing field is SO different than it was, say, 10 years ago. There are so many good pro level horns at good prices that I don't think that anyone who wants a Selmer will shell out four grand for something that's not in their top tier of horns. Perception is reality and if it ain't a Reference or SA80 I don't think that people will buy it for a bunch of money. I know I wouldn't.
 

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For 4k, it surly better not be a lesser horn.
I'm writing this in contrast with the mostly suspicious and dismissive reactions I've read on the forum.

Will be interesting to see if this is the future of Selmer manufacturing. I personally wouldn't mind if they go to a more machined process like Yamaha, as long as the quality is sound. Hey, they have to compete with the rest of the industry too.
I don't think they'll abandon the Selmer Paris line (SA/Reference horns) but rather develop the SeleS brand to cater to a different market.

Kind of like my Tiawanese-made Viking M60?:bluewink2:
When it comes to intonation, sure.

I haven't played the tenor, but if the alto I reviewed is any indication, the color and feel of the Viking M60 are rather different than my VII's and would be even more distinct compared to the Seles which has more of what made my VII and the M60 different.
 

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I don't think they'll abandon the Selmer Paris line (SA/Reference horns) but rather develop the SeleS brand to cater to a different market.
They most certainly will not abandon the Selmer Paris line, but I'm starting to think that the Axos is a test to see how people react to a Paris horn that is less handmade than its predecessors. Selmer is more than well aware of their current labor costs, profit margins, and market share. They would most certainly LOVE to decrease the former while increasing the latter. They previously made a bold tooling/cost cutting change up with the Mark VII, but suffered a pretty harsh backlash. The impact of said backlash was fairly minimal given that there were few competitors in the saxophone market during the mid 70's. Today, it's getting harder and harder to find a "terrible" horn as the Taiwanese, and even Chinese, are creating some very impressive professional quality saxophones. A major misstep in the industry, as it currently is, would be far more devastating than it was during the VII debacle. In order to avoid such a backlash, you have to slowly get your consumer used to the idea that your company doesn't make a handmade product anymore. Hey, they've been doing this maneuver for awhile now. The Jubilee II and III horns require slightly less metal than their predecessors, and require far less labor when it comes to engravings. The Adolphe Sax anniversary alto requires even less labor with its engravings.

This is completely speculation on my end, but as someone who stated that Selmer was hurting their market share with their high retail price, being stuck in that they were also unable to cut their retail due to the cost of French labor, I find it interesting that they've been doing what they could in order to save on labor and material costs ever since. They know that moving production out of France would destroy the image of the brand, but moving to a more automated assembly line production would be a very good compromise. Well, it's a good compromise as long as the market is introduced to the idea slowly. If this were the year 2000, the Axos would be deemed "The End of Selmer". In 2016, it's deemed as "An Intelligent Business Move". When Selmer completely switches over to this manufacturing technique in the next 10 years, it will be deemed "The Finest of Modern Saxophone Production". /rant
 
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