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——————————For now, the plan is to take this to the shop and get a small adjustment, thanks everyone!—-

A few days ago I got this new Keilwerth SX90R tenor (shadow), and things were all playing normal. Last night I was playing on it and realized any note that used the pointer finger on the right hand (aka anything lower than an f) wasnt playing if I held it. If I held it it would do one of 3 things, be a normal note I can hold (rare), play the note an octave higher (more common), and be normal than start breaking and it made this almost flutter tounge sound. I don’t know what is happening, its really stressing me out, when I did buy it the person at the store said I may have to come in to get some keys fixed cause I needed to get used to it. I hope this is whats happening. Any ideas?
Heres the video of the noise it makes: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=IhneDuXo1Rw
Edit: The weird thing is when i play f# its fine
Also thanks to everyone for the advice I plan to take it the the shop for a free of charge minor adjustment.
 

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You have a leak.

If the horn is brand new, it's probably a minor adjustment. It's possible that there is a defective pad or defective factory installation of a pad. So, back to the store for an adjustment - which needs to be free of charge.

There is no such thing as "breaking in" a saxophone.
 

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You might want to quickly check the adjustment screw above the G# pad. It may not be holding the G# pad all the way down.
 

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Most likely a leak. I’ve had the same exact problem happen with other saxes i bought new. For me it was the pad inbetween the g# and f keys. Good luck!
 

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You might want to quickly check the adjustment screw above the G# pad. It may not be holding the G# pad all the way down.
The G# pad is always worth checking but here it doesn't correspond to the symptoms described by the OP. I'd rather place a bet on the aux F pad (the one just above F, linked to the regulation bar actionned by F,E,D).

Help7: and what about F# ?
 

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its really stressing me out, when I did buy it the person at the store said I may have to come in to get some keys fixed cause I need to “break in the saxophone.” I hope this is whats happening. Any ideas?
Do not stress. Just take the sax back to the shop and have their tech fix the issue(s). Nice thing about a new horn, it will cost you nothing (other than the time it takes you to drop it off and pick it up).
 

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I don’t know what is happening, its really stressing me out, when I did buy it the person at the store said I may have to come in to get some keys fixed cause I need to “break in the saxophone.” I hope this is whats happening. Any ideas?
While many of us won’t agree to “breaking in” a horn, it is true that you may apply a different amount of pressure to the keys than whomever set it up. It’s good that the shop is offering you a tweak. That’s important for your peace of mind. Take them up on the opportunity. A new horn should play effortlessly at all dynamic levels throughout its range.

Enjoy your new horn.
 

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Leaks are extremely common in woodwind instruments. You'll want to take your horn in for a check-up about once per year to ensure the pads are sealing well. Sweet horn!
 

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Exactly. In fact, I doubt if there is a saxophone anywhere that doesn't have some issue or another. I spend several days a month working on the five I have, particularly after I get one back from the 'shop'.
 

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... when I did buy it the person at the store said I may have to come in to get some keys fixed cause I need to “break in the saxophone.”
BS!!!
That is like putting a a flag saying, "I don't know how to do my job properly"!
Get a new tech.
 

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While many of us won’t agree to “breaking in” a horn, it is true that you may apply a different amount of pressure to the keys than whomever set it up. It’s good that the shop is offering you a tweak. That’s important for your peace of mind. Take them up on the opportunity. A new horn should play effortlessly at all dynamic levels throughout its range.

Enjoy your new horn.
This is kind of an anomaly to me. Although I completely understand what you're taking about.

I went over to another SOTW member's house when I lived in Vancouver to play some horns and mouthpieces. He had a Mexiconn just like I had at the time. Seemed like the same horn. But he had restored it and set it up. I couldn't play that thing at all. I went to play it. I pressed down the keys like I thought they should be pressed down but no notes would come out of the middle to lower end of the horn at all. Even middle D E and F were nearly impossible to get out.

I handed it back to him and said I think it's broken.

He played on it. And got notes out. I played it again and pressed my fingers down as hard as I possibly could and I in fact was able to get notes out of it too.

I really feel like a saxophone should be easy to play if it's in "playing condition" Nor do I see why anyone would want to have to exert that much force in order to get the notes to simply sound.

The thing is, I've seen him sell a few horns on here from time to time. I never wanted to say anything but I can bet dollars to donuts the people who got his horns were probably wondering.... ***?
 

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Welcome to SoTW Help7...I have a Shadow tenor as well and love it! I’m pretty sure you just need a minor adjustment...take it in and have that done and I suspect you’ll be good to go.
 
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