Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 223 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,253 Posts
Didn't know about that, interesting!

I have a big vintage metal Otto Link Collection and play a Florida (no USA) as my main mouthpiece, so I'm very curious what the new release of Babbitt has to offer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
790 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,253 Posts
Tipsizes seem to only run up to 8* though Peter. Maybe a bit small for you?

https://www.jjbabbitt.com/otto-link-florida#compmto
I normally play bigger tips, but a good 8* isn't bad either (I played an EB 8* as main piece for almost 20 years).

But bigger tips seems to be available as special order:
Non published tip openings available on special request for an extra charge and with a no return policy.
They are not based on a real Florida... and prototypes are around since 4/5 years ago.
But I appreciate the effort of making better/brighter mouthpieces...
A 'real' Florida doesn't exist Tzadik, they are all a little bit different!

This pic gives a nice view into the chamber:
https://www.jjbabbitt.com/otto-link-florida#lg=1&slide=3

It looks like they have taken a current NY STM blank and added a bigger baffle in. The baffle looks a bit like what I've seen in some EB pieces from the 70's. I also see a lot material under the table, which will increase resistance (the Florida's I have seen all have less material under the table).

So maybe not fully based on a 'real' Florida, but I think they can sound well. Only way to find out is playing one!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,025 Posts
That photo looking into the chamber shows the nice baffle but there’s still that “dip of dark death” right after it. The Florida’s and EBs I’ve had, or have, don’t have that drastic dip but a long smooth transition into the chamber.
I still want to try one. Some of the NVS Tone Edges had nice baffles but it seems they used different molds. I had an 8 I got in trade that had a nice long rollover baffle. Only problem is that I play a 6 that I’ve always found is the sweet spot for Links.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
530 Posts
From the webpage:

In trials by professionals, the FL Otto Link received top marks for sound quality and playability. Player comments included:
• ”It is amazing! These are the first current production pieces that truly recreate the best of the vintage mouthpiece sound...dark and powerful, with just the right amount of edge. The baffle is just right—a long rollover—not the shelf baffle that most modern pieces have, and not 'dead' like so many Otto Link copycats. I most appreciate how well the mouthpiece plays top to bottom, with great intonation and response. It makes sense that jj Babbitt would be the one to get it right!”
• “The new FL Otto Link has a rich, warm sound, while still having the quickness of response and flexibility through the entire range of the horn that you need to get your idea across.”
• “A warm big sound throughout [its] range, yet with some edge, if I want it. It reminds me of the old Otto Links I played and wished I hadn’t sold!”
More information is available from local music dealers or at www.jjbabbitt.com



Sounds like these comments are from trials by their professional marketing team!!!
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,786 Posts
I heard this from them when I asked if I could review them:

"We will consider sending you mouthpieces in the near future.
We currently are having them reviewed by Down Beat & others. We have had them play tested by several pros' across the country before we put them in the line.
They will be in stores, as we only make to order, by mid-end of March.
Thank you for your interest in our NY Meyer Alto & FL Otto Link Metal Tenor. "
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
865 Posts
I have more faith in them getting the NY Meyer "right". I've sworn off buying mouthpieces without being able to play test them, at least I can go to PM Woodwind and try both of them when they are released.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member.
Joined
·
1,988 Posts
A 'real' Florida doesn't exist Tzadik, they are all a little bit different!

This pic gives a nice view into the chamber:
https://www.jjbabbitt.com/otto-link-florida#lg=1&slide=3
There are variation due to the manufacturing process... and JJ Babbitt is renowed to provide a huge "variation"...

"Florida" defines a period in which the blanks used were from the same few molds used.
So "Floridas" existed... as STM Early Babbitt existed... and, other then the stamping (on the famous identification chart), you can distinguish a STM from an era to a STM from another era, just looks the external shape.
And in this case, the differences are due to the fact they used different molds... and not because the molds were fuc*ed up by the use.


Molds for casting develope a lot of wear... and a certain point they need to be replaced.
The trick was to have consistancy for the mold and for to the whole systems which kept together the molds during the casting process... and again, JJ Babbitt had some problems with these things as well.


STM EB vs. Florida U.s.a.: https://www.facebook.com/509654555758777/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1229574073766818
It's pretty clear these were made from different molds.

If I can find it... I'll post the comparison between two different version of a Florida No U.s.a.: same stampings, but mouthpieces made from different blanks.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
12,702 Posts
Im pretty sure they dont stamp one mold at a time and the forging plates are not CNC made. Is very likley that there is variation in between pieces made on the same day...not just differences in finishing. I dont know it for an absolute fact but Id gamble a bit on it.

Variation is not always a bad thing...as long as every version is good.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
4,578 Posts
I heard this from them when I asked if I could review them:

"We will consider sending you mouthpieces in the near future.
We currently are having them reviewed by Down Beat & others. We have had them play tested by several pros' across the country before we put them in the line.
They will be in stores, as we only make to order, by mid-end of March.
Thank you for your interest in our NY Meyer Alto & FL Otto Link Metal Tenor. "

Sounds legit. I know I get all my mouthpiece reviews from the writers at Down Beat.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,253 Posts
There are variation due to the manufacturing process... and JJ Babbitt is renowed to provide a huge "variation"...

"Florida" defines a period in which the blanks used were from the same few molds used.
So "Floridas" existed... as STM Early Babbitt existed... and, other then the stamping (on the famous identification chart), you can distinguish a STM from an era to a STM from another era, just looks the external shape.
And in this case, the differences are due to the fact they used different molds... and not because the molds were fuc*ed up by the use.


Molds for casting develope a lot of wear... and a certain point they need to be replaced.
The trick was to have consistancy for the mold and for to the whole systems which kept together the molds during the casting process... and again, JJ Babbitt had some problems with these things as well.


STM EB vs. Florida U.s.a.: https://www.facebook.com/509654555758777/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1229574073766818
It's pretty clear these were made from different molds.

If I can find it... I'll post the comparison between two different version of a Florida No U.s.a.: same stampings, but mouthpieces made from different blanks.
Tzadik, it's not only the blank, but also the difference in finishing a piece (especially baffle and facing, but also chamber). As Phil also mentions pieces of the same blank can differ significant, hence my remark about the fact the definition of a 'real' Florida is not easy in terms of construction (I'm not talking on the Florida period). I own and have played enough metal Links to know about those differences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,166 Posts
Unless jj Babbitt decided to toss all their machining and buy totally new tooling to get smaller tolerances, fire or retrain all the facers, and up their QC game big time, I'm wholly unenthused.

Not that vintage Links are anything resembling consistent, but at least they usually play well, even if differently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,435 Posts
I've played both the NY Meyer and the Florida that Babbitt is releasing and they are both very good mouthpieces.

Babbitt does get pros from all over to play test these. They will send out about 30 pieces in different tip sizes to someone whom then organizes 30 or so pros to play test them all and give notes. To do it right is a lot of work and takes a good amount of time.

I participated in the prototype play testing of the NY Meyers so I got to play all 30 pieces.

As for the Florida Metal Links, I got to play one that my buddy owns (the gentleman running the NY Meyer prototype play test). He received it for playing the Florida prototypes at the factory. It is also a great piece! It was a 7* and I like smaller tips, so I will be ordering a 5* and a 6 to try.

These have been in the pipeline now for many years. I'm glad that Babbitt got it done and they seem to have put a lot of effort in to make some great pieces!! I would think write them off at all.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,806 Posts
I recently bought a Link “Vintage” metal piece, basically a nod to the Tone Master. They’ve been making these for a few years. It is pretty good, the table and facing are well done (though the table isn’t really flat, but has the typical Babbitt concavity). Much better than the current generation STM. Only downside is the shank is noticeably smaller, so much so that I put some sandpaper on a dowel and spent an hour opening it up.

So I have high hopes for the new Florida pieces, it seems clear that they can make a good mouthpiece, maybe the lack of consistency in the standard lines is just a result of hitting a price point. Which is too bad, really, especially that there is only about a $75 difference between the standard STM and the Vintage model.
 
1 - 20 of 223 Posts
Top