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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all,
I know I’ve been posting new threads when I didn’t particularly need to, sorry about that.
Anyway, I broke my mouthpiece and can not find the same model secondhand or new for a reasonable price. I got it for $90au, or about 63 American dollars and it costs about 200$+ brand new. I have been able to find a few sites that have different secondhand mouthpieces at a reasonable price. I don’t believe the mouthpiece makes the sound, but I still need a mouthpiece that can assist me and be easy blowing. As for the sound, I’m looking for a versatile mpc that can be used in jazz, some rock, ballads and just anything. I would like some projection, but that shouldn’t compromise the sound. My main concern is tip opening. Will moving from a t5 v25, which is about a .76 (don’t take my word for that though) to a .96? I’ve got a few mpcs im looking at, some feed back would be great. (They all are hard rubber, as all metal pieces are too expensive for me)
Vandoren java t75
Jody jazz hr- 5-8
Some Claud lakeys, 6*3 and a few 8*3s
Ottolink tone edges-5-9
Vandoren v6 t16
Beechlers-6s
Meyers

I know that softer reeds help with a larger opening, but will they be too big for me regardless/harder to control?
I also live in a place where I cannot try mouthpieces without travelling a far distance
 

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Hi, Bigman01! I don't think there's anything wrong with moving up from where you are to a middle-of-the-road tenor piece like a Java T75, V16 T7, or Jody Jazz hard rubber 7*. Anything in the 6*-7* range (95 thousandths of an inch to 105 thousandths of an inch... dumb "imperial" measurement!) will be very good to learn to be comfortable with, and it won't take long. You could move down a half reed strength to help adjust, but if you get a decent mouthpiece it'll be relatively easy to play even with a larger tip opening. The Vandorens are very consistent and well made. I have a Jody Jazz 7* that I haven't played in a few years but that I liked quite a bit for a long time, too. I've also heard good things about the new D'Addario Select Jazz pieces, so a 6 or 7 by their measurement system would probably feel nice too.

As you get comfortable with the bigger tip opening you can gradually move back up in reed strength, too, if you feel like your sound could use more livening up. As you learn to control the new setup you'll find your sound and intonation might become stronger and more flexible at the same time.

Good luck!
 

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I dont know your level of playing but for the average player the mouthpiece does have a lot to do with tone production. The player certainly dictates a lot...and as the player advances he or she can get a wide range of tones from any piece. Unless you know you are capable if shaping any piece into what you hear I suggest you tald a little about what you want from your tone. I say this because a number of pieces you list go from one extreme to another in terms of tone and color. It seems like a shotgun blast where it would be better to narrow the search to pieces in the general realm of what you want to sound like. You dont have to spend a fortune but you will waste money if you buy a piece at one end of the spectrum when you might really want to be on the other. Its good that you are not looking for chops in a box but you are kind of taking the anti chops in a box to an extreme. The right tool for the job always helps. More information is needed to give any suggestion at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I dont know your level of playing but for the average player the mouthpiece does have a lot to do with tone production. The player certainly dictates a lot...and as the player advances he or she can get a wide range of tones from any piece. Unless you know you are capable if shaping any piece into what you hear I suggest you tald a little about what you want from your tone. I say this because a number of pieces you list go from one extreme to another in terms of tone and color. It seems like a shotgun blast where it would be better to narrow the search to pieces in the general realm of what you want to sound like. You dont have to spend a fortune but you will waste money if you buy a piece at one end of the spectrum when you might really want to be on the other. Its good that you are not looking for chops in a box but you are kind of taking the anti chops in a box to an extreme. The right tool for the job always helps. More information is needed to give any suggestion at this point.
I’m looking for a bit of edge, but still having “flexibility”. I want to be able to get a nice full round tone, but still be able to have a bit of kick if needed. I guess I want my tone to be dark, but when I push it it can scream. I’m not really sure how any of these above mpcs play tonewise, but I think the Claude lakeys are pretty bright. I like bright, but I don’t want it to only be bright. I want to be able to play r&b, jazz , rock but also able to get a sweet warm sound. I hope this helps.
 

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I like lakey for a cheaper mpc. Paul Desmond played a Lakey..very sweet sound, go to my sound clips to hear a Lakey Tenor mpc.

Listen to "Body and Soul" on page 2


www.box.net/cashsax
 

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Damn.... that was pretty good. Would you say a lakey is an all round mouthpiece? Can it be pushed?
A great choice for all around versatility..for a long time around the LA Studio and Big Band scene Claude Lakey handmade mpcs was a hot ticket, pre-sotw days..

Yes, with control you can lay back lush-style or push as hard as you want, plenty of power built in..for some reason Lakeys got a bad rap on SOTW. I use an 8*3 (.090) on alto as a back-up for my Custom gold Sak$hama G (also.090). The Lakey was my main alto mpc for many, many yrs...until discovering a Guardala Studio now replaced with the Sak G..

I do know that the low-priced lakey HR can be as good, or actually better than a few of those very expensive vintage and "boutique" tenor mpcs.

I don't know much about the other newer type metal Lakeys or the plastic one, I am talking strictly about the "Classic" HR model. I currently have two for my Tenors, a newer 7*3 (.113) and a fantastic old 9*3 (.121) My first CL was a 6*3 tenor I got from Claude himself. I played it for many yrs before going to a bigger tip.

They do take some chops to master, not a mpc for a beginner. They are very sensitive and powerful. Actually I don't use them as my primary tenor mpcs anymore, but I won't sell them either. The 7*3 lives in my Bar-horn case for the sessions when I don't bring my Vigilante or my Black Widow. Good luck whatever you choose.:whistle:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Many moons ago when I was an alto player, I played a few lakeys. They where good, I just liked my Meyer better. I don’t remember the lakeys being particularly bright , sensitive or beginner unfriendly, although a lot of people say they are harsh and bright. I’ll keep my eyes open but am still looking at other pieces. Does anybody knowhow the javas play? not jumbo, which has a high step baffle
 

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I would recommend a Vandoren Java t45. Very close in feel to what you're used to (jumping up to .92 from your t25's .80) with a moderate rollover baffle for more edge and a slightly bigger chamber to allow for more airflow and balance out the baffle. Definitely one of the most versatile pieces I've ever played, the price is right, and they are incredibly consistent. Any bigger in the java might feel like somewhat of an extreme jump- check out Ralph Bowen for someone that sounds incredible on just a t45.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I would recommend a Vandoren Java t45. Very close in feel to what you're used to (jumping up to .92 from your t25's .80) with a moderate rollover baffle for more edge and a slightly bigger chamber to allow for more airflow and balance out the baffle. Definitely one of the most versatile pieces I've ever played, the price is right, and they are incredibly consistent. Any bigger in the java might feel like somewhat of an extreme jump- check out Ralph Bowen for someone that sounds incredible on just a t45.
thanks, I'm travelling to the city to try a few pieces, I'll make sure to try one.
 
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