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Distinguished SOTW Member/Bass Sax Boss
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1,851 Posts
I have one of the original MC Gregory baritone pieces, made around 1938, if recent research is correct. I love that mouthpiece and used it for recording with the Palm Beach Pops orchestra and with the Miami City Ballet. I searched for another one for years, but I couldn't find another in any facing or chamber size.
Because of some incredible luck, the Morgan GM uses the exact same mold as my vintage Gregory. I thought I would want to try a larger facing, but the Morgan GM I liked best was the same size as my old Gregory, about .095" and marked 7.
As a matter of fact, the Morgan GM is BETTER than the Gregory. Same great intonation, blows easy, great sound with lots of depth, but the Morgan just has a little spark that makes it better.
This sounds like a paid endorsement, but it's not. I was just ecstatic to find the mouthpiece I had been looking for. If the gig is a screamer, I use a different mouthpiece although I tried the Morgan when things got loud and it worked out OK.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member/Bass Sax Boss
Joined
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1,851 Posts
Although the Morgan GM is the perfect mouthpiece for achieving a Mulligan-like sound, I don't sound like Gerry Mulligan on mine (see my Youtube video under Randy Emerick Morgan GM mouthpiece
) I probably use a softer reed than Gerry Mulligan did, and my baritone saxophone is a Selmer, not a Conn.
I have an old MC Gregory baritone mouthpiece made from the same mold as the Morgan GM, way back in 1938. In 1938 the Gregory must have been considered a VERY powerful mouthpiece. I am amazed at how much sound the Gregory (and the Morgan GM) can produce while maintaining the pitch (intonation) tendencies of early mouthpieces. The GM is definitely a problem solver for baritone players who tend to play sharp in the upper register, and it can compete with other saxes using loud modern high baffle mouthpieces.
 
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