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Discussion Starter #1
Announcing the new line of Morgan Baritone Saxophone Mouthpieces. Production has started on these and they are rolling out the door to customers. The advertising is not quite ready yet for the Morgan website, but they are available to order by phone from the Morgan Company or online from www.junkdude.com. They should be available on the Morgan Website early June.

Players who have had custom baritone pieces made by Erik Greiffenhagen will attest that Erik is a genius mouthpiece designer and the custom baritone pieces he has made from various blanks are among the best baritone mouthpieces ever made.

The Morgan Company is now offering these “custom” pieces using our own Erik designed blanks. All mouthpieces are hand-crafted inside and out by Erik G, Brian Powell and John MacQueen…three of the most experienced mouthpiece craftsmen on the planet…nearly 100 years combined experience! The new models that will be available in June of 2019 are:

Classical Model. A traditional Classical mouthpiece with a large round chamber and no baffle.

Florida Model. Inspired by 1960s Slant Signature Otto Links.

Indiana Model. Inspired by Early Babbitt TENOR Links…similar chamber as the Florida but with a flat or “clam-shell” baffle.

Double Chamber Bari/Bass Model. A unique piece with a very large chamber and rollover baffle. Works great with vintage American baritone and BASS saxophones.

Of course, we continue to make the GM Model Baritone mouthpiece using the original antique M.C. Gregory / Gale Mold used by the Gregory / Gale Company in the 1930s - 1960s.

We are currently making these as they are ordered so plan on 2-3 weeks for delivery. Eventually, we will have stock on hand for immediate delivery, but probably not for a few months. You can order these and other Morgan mouthpieces at www.morganmouthpieces.com or www.junkdude.com
 

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Sounds like there is a good range of pieces to suit most players.
Great to see that not everyone is forgetting about the Bari player.
Also great to see that they’re designed by someone who understands what a Baritone player wants.
Great news
 

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Sure! What do you have to swap? I could review one of your slant links or something...
No Slant Links here although I do have a few nice copies such as Grande Supreme and Aizen SL pieces.
Plus a heap of Link Metals from Masterlink through to current models.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Is the "GM" model also "hand crafted inside and out by Erik G, Brian Powell and John Macqueen"?
Yes, The GM Baritone requires the most hand work of any of the Morgan mouthpieces. The antique mold does about 30% of the work and then the rest is done by hand. So far, Erik is the only one that has made the GM Baritone Model mouthpieces. You can see more of the process of this piece on this blog:

https://www.morganmouthpieces.com/blogs/news/hacked-preview-of-our-new-baritone-saxophone-mouthpiece

The antique molds give the general shape of the mouthpiece, but even the beak needs to be shaped. Of course, the interior chamber, baffle, rails, facing, tip, etc are all also shaped by hand. The mold had not been used for probably 60+ years. Few people would have known how to use this mold. Thanks to Erik G who learned from Ralph Morgan, we knew exactly what to do with it. We knew the rubber formula to use, we knew the press temps and pressure, we knew the curing temps and times and of course how to turn that mouthpiece shaped object into a great playing mouthpiece. Erik nailed it on the first try and is playing on the first piece that came from this mold and we have been in production since with them.
 

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I have one of the original MC Gregory baritone pieces, made around 1938, if recent research is correct. I love that mouthpiece and used it for recording with the Palm Beach Pops orchestra and with the Miami City Ballet. I searched for another one for years, but I couldn't find another in any facing or chamber size.
Because of some incredible luck, the Morgan GM uses the exact same mold as my vintage Gregory. I thought I would want to try a larger facing, but the Morgan GM I liked best was the same size as my old Gregory, about .095" and marked 7.
As a matter of fact, the Morgan GM is BETTER than the Gregory. Same great intonation, blows easy, great sound with lots of depth, but the Morgan just has a little spark that makes it better.
This sounds like a paid endorsement, but it's not. I was just ecstatic to find the mouthpiece I had been looking for. If the gig is a screamer, I use a different mouthpiece although I tried the Morgan when things got loud and it worked out OK.
 

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So is the introduction of the Florida model the reason the Grande Supreme is now in limited supply from Mouthpiece Cafe?
I suspect, although I may be wrong, that the Grande Supreme is brighter than these. After many emails with Erik I deduced that the Morgan ‘florida’ slant copy is similar in brightness to the rubber Yanagisawa that Erik modified for me, which is not nearly as bright as the Grande Suprene I had for a short time. The new double chamber mouthpiece is similar to the Florida but with the additional chamber volume which does spread the sound a little more.
When I asked what would be a good tonal mid-point between my rubber yanagisawa and my Lamberson DD he suggested the Indiana EB-style mouthpiece, without the need for a double chamber modification on my Martin baritone
 

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I have one of the original MC Gregory baritone pieces, made around 1938, if recent research is correct. I love that mouthpiece and used it for recording with the Palm Beach Pops orchestra and with the Miami City Ballet. I searched for another one for years, but I couldn't find another in any facing or chamber size.
Because of some incredible luck, the Morgan GM uses the exact same mold as my vintage Gregory. I thought I would want to try a larger facing, but the Morgan GM I liked best was the same size as my old Gregory, about .095" and marked 7.
As a matter of fact, the Morgan GM is BETTER than the Gregory. Same great intonation, blows easy, great sound with lots of depth, but the Morgan just has a little spark that makes it better.
This sounds like a paid endorsement, but it's not. I was just ecstatic to find the mouthpiece I had been looking for. If the gig is a screamer, I use a different mouthpiece although I tried the Morgan when things got loud and it worked out OK.
saxtek sounds great on this mouthpiece. Has anyone else tried the GM? I am particularly interested in the .105" or .110" tip opening.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
saxtek sounds great on this mouthpiece. Has anyone else tried the GM? I am particularly interested in the .105" or .110" tip opening.
We actually have some 8* (.105) GM Baritones in stock right now. If you are curious, we do offer a 10-day trial period. If you don't like it, send it back for a refund minus the shipping costs. Initial shipping cost to you is free. If you return it, we need to charge a restocking fee to recover our initial restocking fee. We have both the regular shank and the XL shank in stock. If you are on a modern bari or a Selmer Paris, we recommend the regular shank. If you are on a vintage American bari, then we typically recommend the XL.

These are fantastic mouthpieces and really nothing else like them on the market. Making a mouthpiece from one of these antique molds is definitely a lost art. The amount of knowledge, time and craftsmanship that goes into each piece is insane. The Morgan Company is blessed with three of the best and most experienced craftsmen on the planet. I would guess few others on the planet would have the knowledge, skill, and willingness to bring this piece to the market. These are every bit as good as the ones made by the M.C. Gregory Company in the 1940s - 1960s and we are offering them with a lot more openings than they were back then.

They can be ordered from www.morganmouthpieces.com or www.junkdude.com
 

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We have both the regular shank and the XL shank in stock. If you are on a modern bari or a Selmer Paris, we recommend the regular shank. If you are on a vintage American bari, then we typically recommend the XL.
What are the inside diameters, for those shank bores?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
What are the inside diameters, for those shank bores?
The inside of the shank bores of the XL and regular shanks are essentially the same...around 17.80mm. The difference is the XL shank is longer which allows the mouthpiece to sit more securely on the cork of a lot of vintage baritones. The regular shank of the GM tunes pretty far out on the neck of vintage baritones...the XL allows it to sit around mid-cork. In August, we will also be offering the XL shank on the Classical, Florida and Indiana model baritones. These will work well for especially stubborn vintage baritones as well as bass saxes.
 

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Thanks. I assume this issue wouldn't be unique to Morgan mouthpieces, so for a bari that apparently doesn't have this problem, one would get the regular. I'm sure it isn't a myth, but for the present purposes mine don't seem so "vintage", though they're about as old as I am, and I'm "vintage."
 

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Thanks. I assume this issue wouldn't be unique to Morgan mouthpieces, so for a bari that apparently doesn't have this problem, one would get the regular. I'm sure it isn't a myth, but for the present purposes mine don't seem so "vintage", though they're about as old as I am, and I'm "vintage."
Right! This is not unique to the Morgan mouthpieces. Many vintage American baritone saxophones and most basses are picky with mouthpieces and intonation can be a problem. Many modern mouthpieces have intonation issues with vintage baritones and bass saxes. As a result, those that play vintage baritones and basses have a difficult time finding a mouthpiece that gives them both the tone they like and good intonation. The Morgan Company makes all of our baritone models in two versions so if you like the tone, then one or the other version will most likely give you good intonation. As far as I know, we are the only company that does this.

For the most part, if you are on any Selmer Paris (post 1930s) or any modern (post 1970) baritone, then the regular shank version is most likely what you want. If you are on a vintage American baritone or bass, then the XL shank version is most likely the best choice.
 

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FWIW I have a new Morgan Indiana for my Martin Comm iii bari, normal shank length, and it sits on the same place on the cork as my double chambered mouthpieces from Erik. I was going to get the long shank but Erik advised it would be fine without, for me at least.
Great mouthpiece too
 
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