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I recently acquired a NY USA Meyer alto mouthpiece and in order to have it play in tune I have to position it on the neck resulting in very little exposed cork, (Photo on the bottom). The photo on the top shows the position of my M.C. Gregory model A mouthpiece showing the much larger amount of exposed cork that exists in order for it to play it in tune. Is this kind of variation normal? The ID of the Meyer's shank is also slightly larger than the M.C. Gregory's so it is a little loose but does play nicely and doesn't move when palying. The saxophone is a 1956 Selmer MK VI BTW.

Interested in getting some feedback on this. Thank you


View attachment 234618 View attachment 234620
 

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I wouldn't sweat it. More importantly, are the mouthpieces the same length? Probably not, which would explain one being in further to play in tune. Another factor is difference in tip size and chamber, which could also play a role in what you're having to do.
 

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Mouthpieces tune up where they tune up - simple as that. Even the mouthpiece you are used to may tune up at different places on the cork depending on climate and even reed choice.
 

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If you switch back and forth between mpcs, then having one pushed onto the cork a lot more could make the other mpc fit poorly.
 

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If you switch back and forth between mpcs, then having one pushed onto the cork a lot more could make the other mpc fit poorly.
If both mouthpieces have a similar diameter, cylindrical bore, there will be no effect at all. A cork should be cylindrical - not conical - as well. If the cork is shaped as a cone, then it becomes increasingly tight as the mouthpiece is pushed on further, and loose if the mouthpiece is pulled out.
 

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If both mouthpieces have a similar diameter, cylindrical bore, there will be no effect at all. A cork should be cylindrical - not conical - as well. If the cork is shaped as a cone, then it becomes increasingly tight as the mouthpiece is pushed on further, and loose if the mouthpiece is pulled out.
Both "could" and "if" are important.

Since mpcs do not all have the same bore, a narrow bore mpc pushed further on the cork will make a wider bore mpc that gets pushed on less fit poorly.
 

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Both "could" and "if" are important.

Since mpcs do not all have the same bore, a narrow bore mpc pushed further on the cork will make a wider bore mpc that gets pushed on less fit poorly.
I did not write "could". If a narrow bore mouthpiece is shoved on the cork to the point of compressing it, the cork will be a poor fit for the wider bore piece regardless of its position.
 

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Looking at the position of the stub end of the reed on the two mouthpieces, it looks like the Meyer is longer. See post #3.
 

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I did not write "could". If a narrow bore mouthpiece is shoved on the cork to the point of compressing it, the cork will be a poor fit for the wider bore piece regardless of its position.
I was the one who wrote could.

post five, which you quoted in post 6

A mpc could compress a cork so that the cork will be too loose for a different mpc.

I agree with the material quoted above from post eight, except with the proviso that, as in the pictures above from the OP, the more open bore mpc, shoved on a long way, will begin to be a better fit. If the tight bore is only on the cork a little bit, and the open bore is on the cork a whole lot, even if the fit would not be optimum, there will likely be no leak and no wobble. This is particularly the case if the cork is long.

When I got a tight fit on an old Woodwind Company baritone mpc that was perfect for a classical sound, I bought a second neck and set the cork for it. I could have used sandpaper to bore out the old mpc, but I wanted to keep it original.
 

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Looking at the position of the stub end of the reed on the two mouthpieces, it looks like the Meyer is longer. See post #3.

The shanks of the two mpcs are of differing lengths.

The stub end of the reed would stick out a whole bunch if it was a tenor reed, for example.
 

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View attachment 234634


Here is a frame from a 1964 Brirish Jazz TV show, "Jazz 625" The altoist appears to also have very little cork left.

Some people urge folk to push the mpc all the way down to cover the entire cork on micro tuners automatically, regardless.

The amount of cork used does not make any difference, so long as the mpc is held securely and the horn plays well.
 
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