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Discussion Starter #1
hi,

I like modern saxophone :
  • I can't live without a F# key (to get my altissimo G)
  • I have small hands so I can't play old horn like a Selmer CigarCut for example (I tried one)
  • I need good ergonomic, tuning
I've been playing a T901 for 12 years now and I'd like to have a "more" professional horn but the price tag for the TWO20 or a new selmer is super high.
Besides it seems that new horns lose a LOT of their value once you buy it. Make may be wonder if I should try to find a second hand series 3 or SA80, what's your opinion?
 

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A T901 is a professional horn. You can't find one that's "more professional." If you feel like you'd prefer a Selmer then find one, but it'd be sideways movement, not up. Whether you like it better comes down to personal preference.
 

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I second that the T901 is a perfectly fine horn. What makes you want a change? Maybe you just need to spend some of that new horn money on a tune up of your old friend to get it back in tip top shape.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I totally agree, unless you have identified something about your T901 that doesn't allow you to play professionally on it, I would advise to stick with it. Even then, whatever is wrong can be fixed by a good tech to make it professional again.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I'm very pleased with my T901, it is in good shape (checked every year). It's probably a GAS but recently I tried a series 3 and it felt easy to play (keys action, ergonomy). Of course I recorded my self playing the series 3 and it sounds very similar to my T901 (of course same player)

Anyway, my question is more general : If I had to buy a horn, why would I buy a new one as there are some nice second hand and the value of newer sax drops quickly?
 

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Maybe a heavier, fully-ribbed construction horn, and its different response, is what you're after. Otherwise, as others have already advised, you have a horn comparable in quality to the ones you're considering.

You're correct in shooting for a lightly used newer horn (how old are SA-80 horns now, 10-20 years old?).
 

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I'm very pleased with my T901, it is in good shape (checked every year). It's probably a GAS but recently I tried a series 3 and it felt easy to play (keys action, ergonomy). Of course I recorded my self playing the series 3 and it sounds very similar to my T901 (of course same player)

Anyway, my question is more general : If I had to buy a horn, why would I buy a new one as there are some nice second hand and the value of newer sax drops quickly?
I would think that a "slightly used", but modern saxophone is the best deal. You have to drop a lot of coin for a brand new or a vintage Selmer. I can imagine that for some folks, new horns are preferred because they don't know what they're getting with a slightly used or vintage horn. Also, they are somewhat easier to find locally.
 

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I'm very pleased with my T901, it is in good shape (checked every year). It's probably a GAS but recently I tried a series 3 and it felt easy to play (keys action, ergonomy). Of course I recorded my self playing the series 3 and it sounds very similar to my T901 (of course same player)

Anyway, my question is more general : If I had to buy a horn, why would I buy a new one as there are some nice second hand and the value of newer sax drops quickly?
You are spot on. Your brand new horn will instantly be a nice used horn as soon as you pay for it. Let someone else absorb the depreciation, and buy a good used horn. I recall recently seeing a Selmer Serie III tenor in the market place. They are good horns. Figure on getting it set up properly whether you buy new or used. For a few thousand dollars, you can find most any used modern tenor you might consider - Selmer, Keilwerth, Yamaha, Yanagisawa.
 

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901 yanagisawa are intermediate saxophones.
991 were the professional at that time.

SA80 Selmers have been around since the 80's.
new saxophones or new anything really, one loses about 30% just walking out the shop door.
one can find great secondhand saxophones in many places around the world.
where are you in the world?
 

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901 yanagisawa are intermediate saxophones.
991 were the professional at that time.

SA80 Selmers have been around since the 80's.
new saxophones or new anything really, one loses about 30% just walking out the shop door.
one can find great secondhand saxophones in many places around the world.
where are you in the world?
901 are professional saxophones.
991 are also professional saxophones, but a different model.

You've experienced Yani's poor marketing strategy.
 

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If a horn has had its tone holes filed before checking if it was straight by a "repair tech", it doesn't matter what model it is - it's time to get a new horn. I wish I could say this rarely happens, but my shop has seen it far too often.
 

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If a horn has had its tone holes filed before checking if it was straight by a "repair tech", it doesn't matter what model it is - it's time to get a new horn. I wish I could say this rarely happens, but my shop has seen it far too often.
What post are you responding to? This comment doesn’t make sense.
 

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It obviously makes sense to buy a good second-hand quality saxophone when one is available. Where I live most of the offerings always seem to be the cheaper Yamahas, a few Jupiters and a selection of Chinese offerings. The majority of them are altos. I suspect that in many cases someone started to learn on them and then changed course. Yanagisawas, Yamaha Customs, etc., rarely turn up. Sometimes, when they do, owners often have unrealistic expectations. So, buying new can be more painful in money terms, but altogether much easier.
 

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901 yanagisawa are intermediate saxophones.
991 were the professional at that time.
Wrong. Please don't spread misinformation that has been repeatedly debunked already.
Is this "misinformation" ? If so, exactly where has it "been repeatedly debunked already" ? Or to put it another way, why should those reading this thread give LostConn's word precedence over livingthedream's word ?

As I recall, Yanagisawa marketed the T901 as a professional level instrument, until they released their new T991 professional model, whereupon they downgraded the T901 to entry level…

Marketing ! A professional horn is a horn which is played regularly by a professional. I know professionals who are more than happy with their Yamaha YTS-21s.

If the OP wants to investigate the Yanagisawa T901 and T991, as well as the Yamaha YTS-62, I suggest he read Stephen Howard's reviews of these instruments:

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/Reviews/Saxes/Tenor/yanagisawa_901_tenor.htm#Top

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/Reviews/Saxes/Tenor/Yanagisawa_991_tenor.htm

http://www.shwoodwind.co.uk/Reviews/Saxes/Tenor/Yamaha_YTS62.htm

He has worked on and played them all.
 

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Personally I -and a few more 'folks in the know' -prefer the 901. One of my musical buddies has a 901 with a bronze neck-i went with him to buy it, he (we) must have tried around 15 tenors, all makes ,all high end, the 901 beat the lot, .....it was an eye opener-oh it was second hand too!
 

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Is this "misinformation" ? If so, exactly where has it "been repeatedly debunked already" ? Or to put it another way, why should those reading this thread give LostConn's word precedence over livingthedream's word ?
Because I own three Yanagisawa saxes and therefore have spent a lot of time reading about the history of the company. I understand that this subject is probably not of significant interest to most people, but even casually acquired bits of mistaken information are still mistaken.

Here's a good short summary of the "intermediate horn" mislabeling: https://www.kesslerandsons.com/product/yanagisawa-two1-professional-tenor-sax/. The key point here is that it was never Yanagisawa itself that used the category "intermediate" in connection with the 901 horns. That was Leblanc, and unfortunately the terminology persisted in some people's minds even after Leblanc was long out of the picture.

Please note that I am hardly the first person in the history of SOTW to point this out. As the previous comments in this thread indicate, the professional status of the T901 is generally understood here.

As I recall, Yanagisawa marketed the T901 as a professional level instrument, until they released their new T991 professional model, whereupon they downgraded the T901 to entry level…
There was no gap between the introductions of the T901 and the T991. Yanagisawa alto and tenor models have been introduced in pairs (not counting sterling silver or bronze variants) at least since the T880 was phased out. First came the T900 and T990, then the T900μ and the T990μ, then the T901 and the T991. Today, we have the TWO1 and the TWO10. Yanagisawa never "downgraded" any of these models. They were always positioned as the less expensive, single-post construction pro horn, and the more expensive, ribbed construction pro horn.

"Entry level" is not a very helpful description because its meaning can vary wildly, depending on the range of horns being discussed. To many people, "entry level" means a student horn -- the cheapest instrument one can buy to get a foothold in the saxophone world. But if a company doesn't offer a student horn, but rather two or three professional models with different features, then "entry level" may simply mean the least expensive model of the group. The Super Action 80 Series II is arguably the "entry level" saxophone from Selmer Paris (if one disregards the SeleS Axos). Regardless, the T901 was not downgraded to an "entry level" role. It was the successor instrument to the similarly positioned T900 and T900μ.
 

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901 are professional saxophones.
991 are also professional saxophones, but a different model.

You've experienced Yani's poor marketing strategy.
yes,probably this is the case.
i have also had a few yanagisawa's of different numbers,and i love them all.
because the 901 was a cheaper horn,that is why i called them intermediate.
no real drama.
 

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LostConn: thank you for providing (Post #18, above) the information I asked for. It is most informative, particularly the Kessler webpage.
 
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