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First I want to appologize for the long thread because I know it will be. (Please skip to the (Ok now to the question) part if you dont want to read all this lol. I have been lurking here for about a year and I love this forum. I started playing the tenor at about the same time. The things I have already learned directly from this forum are:
1) Longtones, longtones, longtones
2) You will develop G.A.S
3) Get an instructor
4) The further you move from your mouth the less the equipment changes the sound
5) Reed strenth is not a measure your manhood
6) Your tone/intonation is of utmost importance and wont come easy
7) Practice, practice, practice

My setup is a Trevor James Revolution tenor with a Morgan 3C/Vandoran blue box #2. I bought it new and had it checked out. It was good to go.

Now for a little of the back story. I originally played with the stock no-name mouthpiece and although it wasnt bad, I wanted something a little darker. I decided on the Morgan 3C. Over the short time I have been playing I worked my way up to a #3 reed because the 2/2.5 sounded too buzzy to me. I heard that moving up may help that. Well it did and I liked the sound I got from the #3. However, I soon realized that I was having to contort my throat, tongue, and lip-up so much for some of the higher notes like E and F (not altissmo of course) that I must be doing something wrong. So I believe I was lipping-up so much it may have been biting. I always start my session with longtones and had been practicing decresendo but again was having to really contort my throat/tongue and HAD to lip-up to do this. I have recently been reading that you really should be able to do it with just your air pressure/volume.
So lately I have returned to #2 reeds even though I really dont like the buzziness (and have ordered Alexander Classique and Legere Signature #2's). But I now seem to be able to keep the higher notes in tune with just embouchure tightening and loosening.

Ok now to the question (told you it would be long). I ask for the advice of the really experienced players here. I believe I may be opening a can of worms. I have read here on this site that you should:
1) Lip-up to bring the note into tune but dont bite
2) DO NOT lip up, just tighten or loosen your embouchure to tune the note
3) ONLY use your tongue, throat, and oral cavity to tune the notes

I am just beginning so I am willing to learn the right way, even if it is the longer way. Please dont mind stepping on toes if you really believe one way is the correct answer. (I realize that they can all get you to the end result, but I have heard that some options can limit your sound later on and I really want to avoid those bad habits).

I would love to have an instructor, however I am in the Air Force stationed in South Korea. I have looked for an instructor and only found one but we are so busy here he hasnt found the time. Thanks for spending the time to read this novel.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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1) Lip-up to bring the note into tune but dont bite
2) DO NOT lip up, just tighten or loosen your embouchure to tune the note
3) ONLY use your tongue, throat, and oral cavity to tune the notes
Most people mean the same by (1) and (2)

I've never been able to do (3) and it possibly didn't hinder a professional career.
 
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