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Discussion Starter #1
I did use the search function, however I couldn't find The exact information I wanted and I know there is a lot of opinion involved. The number is 553388 Which puts it right in the 70s and yes after the Selmer buyout. I got this at $200.00 even after shipping and it has been professionally serviced,adjusted, and regulated. The pads are brand new its just has some dents and some luster fading. This horn plays very nice and will sound even better when I get my 20s era rubber Buescher mouth piece tomorrow. This thing is way better than any student horn that I have ever played the guy I bought it from had a Vandoren T75 metal mpc on it. I didn't get lucky enough to get that mpc with it he sent the original mpc. So anyways enough of my rambling. Here are pictures.

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There will be a few more that will follow. So for my actual question Is there any information that can be backed up or is solid on when the Selmer company stopped using golden age Buescher parts and design? I know that around the 80s is when they went full swing cheap parts and way different design, Does anyone know the bore dimensions from the buescher aristocrat and the "Selmer" Buescher aristocrat and I'm talking post buy out to 70s model. Like I said before this thing plays very well it has very good intonation. I would just really like some technical info on it because they seem to have such a bad name because of the Selmer stigma. I can't wait to hear replies!
 

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I am sure the experts will pitch in here with some additional information on how the solid Buescher transition to cheap Selmer happened. I am not qualified to help here.

My take on this is: It seems that you got a nice horn in full playing condition, with a sound you like, for just $ 200.00. It doesn't get much better, regardless of what the lore is around this vintage.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I really do hope that happens just because I am always so curious about the bad rap. I absolutely agree! I did just get in one of my mpcs and wow did this thing scream. The lows are a dark bellowing low the highs are bright(I may have not described that right it sounds like I just came out of the 50s lol). It sounds absolutely astounding, I really didn't think I would get this kind of quality out of a sax that is labeled as a student horn. I am super happy about this thing!

I am sure the experts will pitch in here with some additional information on how the solid Buescher transition to cheap Selmer happened. I am not qualified to help here.

My take on this is: It seems that you got a nice horn in full playing condition, with a sound you like, for just $ 200.00. It doesn't get much better, regardless of what the lore is around this vintage.
 

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I am not an expert, but a Buescher player and fan. This is the last design Buescher used for the Aristocrat (circa 1960) before the Selmer buyout. Granted, these aren't the Aristocrats of the "golden age" of Buescher, but very solid saxes I believe based on an older True-tone design. (experts will have to chime in on this.) The brass wire key guards were more better quality saxes. The sheet metal screw-on key guards may look prettier, but can be a sign when American saxes started being cheapened in the case of Buescher and Conn 1970's. Saxes with the brass wire guards seem to be more sought after from what I've read and seen when people look at old Bueschers and Conns. So, basically for 200 bucks you have a sax probably more sturdier than any new cheap saxophone made today and will last a lifetime if taken care of.
 

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The issue with later Aristocrats is inconsistency. Some are like yours, others not so hot. They are a True Tone body tube.
 
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