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Discussion Starter #1
My wife just gave birth to baby #2...I remember when baby #1 was born, I couldn't play sax at home for months as my wife was worried that I'd wake up the baby, aggravate the baby, or make her persistent headache (caused by sleep deprivation) worse. So I played melodica for months instead.

This time I want to play sax. What sax do you think could be played quietest? Alto, Tenor, or Soprano? any particular set up? Thanks for any advice on this subject.
 

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Big Congratulations!!!:) :)

Maybe not the answer you want but I would say baritone. With the right set-up you can play whisper soft in a nice soothing range.
 

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What about an EWI or something like that as it's completely silent if you hook up to headphones?
 

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My kid's nine months old ... played tenor straight through with backing tracks and the lot just closing the door to the room I practiced in.

Baby slept like a rock from day one and now loves to see me practice in the house smiling from ear to ear ...

give it a try!
L.
 

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Congratulations on the new baby!!

Our daughter managed to keep me, her mother and her mother-in-law thoroughly exhausted for her first three months. I thought it was quite an accomplishment for such a little thing. Then she gradually started sleeping longer and things started getting better. She's now 20 months and sleeps great but I'm still not allowed to practice in the house when she's sleeping.

However, to answer your question, first in jest: I suggest contrabass saxophone because the vibrations and rumbling will remind the baby of its mother's heartbeat.

Now more seriously. Call Paul Maslin at PMwoodwind.com. I was just there a week ago and he had a new sax practice mute that he was testing. It's very simple - three pieces of spongy material on little metal frames, one for the mouthpiece, one for the neck, and one for the bell. He said it worked pretty well, cutting the volume in about half without increasing the resistance too much. I'm sure he's not selling them yet (and I believe he said it's not being sold in the U.S. at all yet), but you might give him a call to see if he expects to sell them, what they might cost, and when they might be available. Not exactly what you asked for but I hope it might help.
 

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Your not going to find a brand of saxophone that is more quiet than others. But a classical mouthpiece will allow you to play soft with just enough resistance to get a nice tone.

I'd rework all the Ferling studies with a classical mouthpiece on alto at the softest dynamic. Since you can't start blasting solos over aebersolds it's a great time to work up all the mundane scales/etudes/etc...

It's also a great time to put on some earphones and quietly transcribe some of those solo's you've been intriqued with.

You could potentially get more out of your practice time simply because you're forced to do some things a little differently.
 

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My 1 1/2 year old can sleep through a trumpet, tenor, baritone and trombone horn section rehearsal in the next room!! Woo Hoo!
 

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Congratulations on #2! :binky: I exposed my girls to music constantly as soon as they were born and they were none the worse for it. It's debatable but all three have an aptitude for music too.

Can't say I practiced my sax around them though so not sure how that would have come out. But after they were about a month old we were taking them out and they would sleep through a 30 voice choir practice for about an hour and a half. It's amazing what they can do. Does sound like the perfect opportunity to practice some quiet subtones perhaps?

Don't tell my wife, but at home, I would intentionlly run a vacuum while they were sleeping to see if they could sleep through it and get them used to noise. Well, okay, I was also getting back at them for keeping me up until 2 in the morning because of their colick. (Never told the wife about that either! :D ) Can't advise you to do the same but I never thought it hurt to experiment, just a little bit! :)
 

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chitownjazz said:
Now more seriously. Call Paul Maslin at PMwoodwind.com. I was just there a week ago and he had a new sax practice mute that he was testing. It's very simple - three pieces of spongy material on little metal frames, one for the mouthpiece, one for the neck, and one for the bell. He said it worked pretty well, cutting the volume in about half without increasing the resistance too much. I'm sure he's not selling them yet (and I believe he said it's not being sold in the U.S. at all yet), but you might give him a call to see if he expects to sell them, what they might cost, and when they might be available. Not exactly what you asked for but I hope it might help.
Congrats on another miracle of life :cheers:

I guess this is what chitownjazz is talking about Overhere they run around 45 Euro's, wich seems a lot for some sponges. But then again, most sax related products are often more expensive on this side of the pond.
 

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This is also my experience and I would practice until 2AM (albeit at that point, very quietly for my other neigbors in the apt). Except, my daughter is now 14 months old and if I practice in another room she tends to freak out and insists on being in the same room. :)

Lorenzo Muan said:
My kid's nine months old ... played tenor straight through with backing tracks and the lot just closing the door to the room I practiced in.

Baby slept like a rock from day one and now loves to see me practice in the house smiling from ear to ear ...

give it a try!
L.
 

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My son was born with Kind of Blue playing in the background. As a newborn, we'd put him to bed while listening to Ella.

He has always loved my saxophones, but at 2-3 months, he was being carried by my wife with his head on her shoulder and his arm hanging over while I was practicing my clarinet (I was running through some Parker heads). He was actually swinging his arm in tempo. I stopped and started several times and he stopped and started accordingly; this is while he was half asleep...

He's now almost 17 months and has discovered my wife's old recorder. He blows a note, smiles, dances for a few seconds, and continues. :)

I've played every wind instrument I own around him and he's responded very well. Sometimes I wake him, but when I do, he usually sits up all happy and say, "Da Da".

I wouldn't worry about what to play so much as just common sense stuff (i.e. don't have him stick his head in the bell and then belt out a fff Low-Bb, etc.,).

Congratulations on #2!
 

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I have a 2 year old and a 4 year old - I try to practice 5 to 6:30 AM during the week. Both stay asleep with no problems. My wife may complain but such is life.

My kids got use to the sound. Hopefully some of the stuff I'm playing will sink in so when they pick up a horn (if they pick up a horn) they'll start where I've ended.
 

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Grumpie said:
Congrats on another miracle of life :cheers:

I guess this is what chitownjazz is talking about Overhere they run around 45 Euro's, wich seems a lot for some sponges. But then again, most sax related products are often more expensive on this side of the pond.
Yup, that's the item. I had a feeling it would be expensive - the sponges are clearly high tech! On the other hand, if it keeps you practicing it might be worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all the nice messages and great advice! I'm going to try Sinkdrain's suggestion tonight (the classical mouthpiece) and go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
at school, I lived in the "quiet dorm" and I traded my alto and tenor for a soprano sax thinking it could be played quietly and I could get away with playing it in the dorm...of course, to get a satisfactory sound out of the soprano, I had to blast it much louder than the alto or tenor...but I wasn't sure if it was just me and that maybe I should try another soprano. Thanks again.
 

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Art_Salt said:
at school, I lived in the "quiet dorm" and I traded my alto and tenor for a soprano sax thinking it could be played quietly and I could get away with playing it in the dorm...of course, to get a satisfactory sound out of the soprano, I had to blast it much louder than the alto or tenor...but I wasn't sure if it was just me and that maybe I should try another soprano. Thanks again.
There is something about the sound of a soprano that seems to carry far beyond what the apparent volume would seem to suggest.
 

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For our daughter, I put a white noise generator in her room, and shut the door to practice. It works pretty well, no complaints.
 

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Glad to hear you are having some success practicing with babies in the house. I think it's important to stress for any new parents that are reading this: make sure your baby sleeps well. All you "old parental hands" know the importance of this already. It's not so much an issue with newborns - they'll sleep when they want. But as they get a little older they really need to be trained to sleep. My wife became a master of this after reading Dr. Wiesbluth's book, Healthy Sleep Habits, Healthy Child. It's a bit of a disorganized mess but if you can manage distill the basic information out of it, it's a great help.
 

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chitownjazz said:
Glad to hear you are having some success practicing with babies in the house. I think it's important to stress for any new parents that are reading this: make sure your baby sleeps well. All you "old parental hands" know the importance of this already. It's not so much an issue with newborns - they'll sleep when they want. But as they get a little older they really need to be trained to sleep. My wife became a master of this after reading Dr. Wiesbluth's book, Healthy Sleep Habits, Healthy Child. It's a bit of a disorganized mess but if you can manage distill the basic information out of it, it's a great help.
Just don't make the mistake my sister-in-law did. She thought it had to be quite her baby to sleep. As a result *any* noise will wake my precious niece... Don't fall into that trap.
 
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