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Discussion Starter #1
My teacher told me that Nestico had definite rules for solos. For the III7 and the II7 he wanted the 5th mode of the harmonic minor, and for the VI7 and II7 it was the 5th mode of the major scale. It seems to me that you could use either at any time, but maybe he didn't want the soloist to screw up his arrangements. Have any of you guys heard this before?
 

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no.
 

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You have to explain this a little better.... I think I might understand what you are saying, but I'm not sure.
 

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My teacher told me that Nestico had definite rules for solos.
I was weaned on Nestico charts, starting from his earlier charts when he was a DC military arranger, forward. I personally have never seen any directions regarding what scales to use. Another point - although I have no doubt Sammy knows all of the "modes", etc, I just don't think telling a soloist to play "the 5th mode of the harmonic minor over a III7 or II7" would be in his normal vocabulary. I'd like to see him tell Basie's soloists what scale/chord to play and when.

I really don't know the answer to the question, but I would be interested in knowing if he actually was that directive on what chord/scale to use, or if he would be recommending these usages perhaps in more specific contexts, i.e. school big band clinics and the like.
 

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I'm with Gary. I have never heard of an arranger having "rules" for solos let alone Sammy Nestico. Doesn't make any sense to me.
 

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One of the things I loved about his arrangements/charts is having four bars to each line on the page. A great help in knowing where you are!
 

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I really don't know the answer to the question, but I would be interested in knowing if he actually was that directive on what chord/scale to use, or if he would be recommending these usages perhaps in more specific contexts, i.e. school big band clinics and the like.
This is the context I could see this happening, maybe even coming from the Publisher and not Nestico.
 

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Man, I've been playing this wrong for so many years!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'll e-mail my teacher to see where he heard that. I think what he wants is for me to not always rely on the mixolydian scale for unaltered dominants although the harmonic minor does give some altered extended tones.
 

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One of the things I loved about his arrangements/charts is having four bars to each line on the page. A great help in knowing where you are!
Every musician would benefit from reading a book on preparing music manuscript.
 

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I worked for several years at Passport Designs as a programmer on Encore, a music notation program. One of the reference books we used was one which I bought many years previous, when I actually used to copy music by hand (gasp!).

The Art of Music Copying by Clinton Roemer.

This is the definitive book on the subject, and man oh man, a well copied part makes it so much easier to read. Especially when you have to sight read on the gig.

Aside from penmanship techniques, every point in that book is valid today, and will remain so until we all read from DAW piano rolls instead...

My memory of the many Sammy Nestico charts I've played leads me to believe the people that copied his arrangements had read that book too. The 4-bar-per-line rule is just one of many factors that goes into making a written part readable.
 
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