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Hi all, I am starting another thread because the last one was such a great learning experience. The previous thread was about finding the right mouthpiece (MP) for my Conn 10M. I choose to get an Otto Link, NY, *7. This is the first Link I have played on and the first metal MP as well. My other MP is a Yahama 4C. My 10M was made in 1960, if that makes a difference.

So far I am finding it more difficult to play. I had been using Vandoran Java Red box, #3. I've been told that the Reds are more like a 3 1/2. I will get some new Reds in 2 1/2 Monday but for now I am playing on some old 2 1/2's. The 3's were too hard for the Link. I guess the larger tip opening will take some getting used to. Playing scales with the Link is proving more difficult for some reason. But jamming along with the Latin Jazz show on kcsm.org is almost as easy as my old setup.

I can't tell yet if I like this MP or not. I've been warned that it was going to be a big change that will take some time getting used to. I am not sure exactly how to place the ligature on the reed. As well I don't know how tight to fasten the ligature to the reed. The darn thing didn't come with operating instructions. The tightening screw could benefit from fine threads, I think. The reed likes to slip around on the metal table. I don't know if I am over-tightening to compensate for the slippage.

There's been lots of talk about the new Link's being inconsistent and prone to being lemons. How am I supposed to know if I have a good one or not ? I did check the table by placing it on a flat steel surface and looking across the side in front of a light. There is a very slight concavity. I am told that it was designed this way but that the bad ones have to much. I think this one is OK because the reed seals without over-tightening the ligature. I got this Link from junkdude.com. Dave assured me that they visually inspect all MP's. He said that they sell a lot of the new Links and have very few returns.

Cheer, Dave
 

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Honestly I’d start with a 2, relax, and blowwww. A 7* NY has a big chamber, low baffle, and a much bigger tip than you’re used to playing.
 

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Honestly I’d start with a 2, relax, and blowwww. A 7* NY has a big chamber, low baffle, and a much bigger tip than you’re used to playing.
Hi Buddy, I think I will take that advice. Lot's of changes to adjust to.
 

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I bought an HR Link Tone Edge 7* late last year, and it took me some time to get used to the larger opening, after having been playing a Hite Premier. I ended up going back to the Hite for awhile, after spending a few months on the Link. Next time I tried the Link, I was suddenly having no trouble with it. Now, I consider it the best money I've ever spent.......what a great piece! Give it some time, and definitely go with the 2.5's.
I'm contemplating buying a 10M myself, and I truly hope my Tone Edge works on it, if I do. Best of luck.
 

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Hi all, I am starting another thread because the last one was such a great learning experience. The previous thread was about finding the right mouthpiece (MP) for my Conn 10M. I choose to get an Otto Link, NY, *7. This is the first Link I have played on and the first metal MP as well. My other MP is a Yahama 4C. My 10M was made in 1960, if that makes a difference.

So far I am finding it more difficult to play. I had been using Vandoran Java Red box, #3. I've been told that the Reds are more like a 3 1/2. I will get some new Reds in 2 1/2 Monday but for now I am playing on some old 2 1/2's. The 3's were too hard for the Link. I guess the larger tip opening will take some getting used to. Playing scales with the Link is proving more difficult for some reason. But jamming along with the Latin Jazz show on kcsm.org is almost as easy as my old setup.

I can't tell yet if I like this MP or not. I've been warned that it was going to be a big change that will take some time getting used to. I am not sure exactly how to place the ligature on the reed. As well I don't know how tight to fasten the ligature to the reed. The darn thing didn't come with operating instructions. The tightening screw could benefit from fine threads, I think. The reed likes to slip around on the metal table. I don't know if I am over-tightening to compensate for the slippage.

There's been lots of talk about the new Link's being inconsistent and prone to being lemons. How am I supposed to know if I have a good one or not ? I did check the table by placing it on a flat steel surface and looking across the side in front of a light. There is a very slight concavity. I am told that it was designed this way but that the bad ones have to much. I think this one is OK because the reed seals without over-tightening the ligature. I got this Link from junkdude.com. Dave assured me that they visually inspect all MP's. He said that they sell a lot of the new Links and have very few returns.

Cheer, Dave
See this:

https://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?341860-Embouchure-Exercises-Revisited-Phil-Barone
 

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You need to do long tones for like a month to get used to this radical a jump. Going from a 4C t a 7* NY Link is a huge change. You have to blow like 3 times the air because of the larger tip and the huge chamber. I would have suggested maybe a 6 or 6* regular Link as the tip opening and chamber size are not as radically different as the NY 7*. But you have it now so might as well go for it. The biggest difference is the amount of air needed. Practice long tones with the focus of taking in a lot of air and using your diaphram to support the air as you blow. Try to fill the whole horn with air and think of filling the whole room with sound. As big a sound as you can get. You can always dial it back later but right now you want to get used to blowing enough air to fill the room with sound. I think going down to the softer reed will certainly help.......
 

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You need to do long tones for like a month to get used to this radical a jump. Going from a 4C t a 7* NY Link is a huge change. You have to blow like 3 times the air because of the larger tip and the huge chamber. I would have suggested maybe a 6 or 6* regular Link as the tip opening and chamber size are not as radically different as the NY 7*. But you have it now so might as well go for it. The biggest difference is the amount of air needed. Practice long tones with the focus of taking in a lot of air and using your diaphram to support the air as you blow. Try to fill the whole horn with air and think of filling the whole room with sound. As big a sound as you can get. You can always dial it back later but right now you want to get used to blowing enough air to fill the room with sound. I think going down to the softer reed will certainly help.......
Yeah I was almost going to ask if he could return it for a regular STM 6, but didn't because I figured it was probably too late to do so. And the big issue here is because of the big jump in setup this is where the bad habits can set in (too much jaw pressure, etc). It's going to take some real self-assessment, doing super-relaxed longtones focused on filling the entire horn with air, as Neff described above. STAY RELAXED, this is the best advice I can give... if it's too hard to blow, step down in reed strength. It shouldn't be difficult to play...
 

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Try to exchange it for a 6. Nodoby needs to play a bigger tip opening than that.
A 7* with a 2 reed wouldn’t be what I would think of as a classic Link sound.
If you’re determined to play too big a tip try a softer Rigotti reed. They work well with Links.
 

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Yeah I was almost going to ask if he could return it for a regular STM 6, but didn't because I figured it was probably too late to do so. And the big issue here is because of the big jump in setup this is where the bad habits can set in (too much jaw pressure, etc). It's going to take some real self-assessment, doing super-relaxed longtones focused on filling the entire horn with air, as Neff described above. STAY RELAXED, this is the best advice I can give... if it's too hard to blow, step down in reed strength. It shouldn't be difficult to play...
I've been making mouthpieces for almost forty years and playing longer than that. All you have to do is go down in reed strength and take more mouthpiece in your mouth, that's all. It's a few thousandths of an inch we're talking about for Christ's sake, nothing and you'll get a bigger sound too. Phil
 

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Try to exchange it for a 6. Nodoby needs to play a bigger tip opening than that.
A 7* with a 2 reed wouldn’t be what I would think of as a classic Link sound.
If you’re determined to play too big a tip try a softer Rigotti reed. They work well with Links.
The misinformation on here astounds me. Phil Barone
 

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My very first mouthpiece was a metal Otto Link 8*. Why? Cause that is what they gave me at the store, and i didnt know anything about tip sizes or how to make a sound.
My teacher didnt seem to mind at all. And since none told me that was too big or wrong in some way it was just fine, and i used it for many many years to learn and improve.
I missed all that progression from small to big tip opening. Only the reeds got harder.
 

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In my mind, that huge chamber is more the issue than the tip opening. A Yamaha 4C has a pretty small square chamber. You don't have to blow a lot of air for that. You are going from that to a piece with one of the biggest chambers on the market. I personally have never gotten on well with the NY Links because of that huge chamber. I do have one that I got to work great for me but that was because I put a home made baffle in it. I'm assuming Dave at Junkdude suggested the NY Link because 10M's like bigger chamber mouthpieces from what I have heard. Regardless of all this, my advice is still the same......long tones couple with Phil's advice and see where it takes you and how you do.......Good Luck!
 

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Hi all, I am starting another thread because the last one was such a great learning experience. The previous thread was about finding the right mouthpiece (MP) for my Conn 10M. I choose to get an Otto Link, NY, *7. This is the first Link I have played on and the first metal MP as well. My other MP is a Yahama 4C. My 10M was made in 1960, if that makes a difference.

So far I am finding it more difficult to play. I had been using Vandoran Java Red box, #3. I've been told that the Reds are more like a 3 1/2. I will get some new Reds in 2 1/2 Monday but for now I am playing on some old 2 1/2's. The 3's were too hard for the Link. I guess the larger tip opening will take some getting used to. Playing scales with the Link is proving more difficult for some reason. But jamming along with the Latin Jazz show on kcsm.org is almost as easy as my old setup.

I can't tell yet if I like this MP or not. I've been warned that it was going to be a big change that will take some time getting used to. I am not sure exactly how to place the ligature on the reed. As well I don't know how tight to fasten the ligature to the reed. The darn thing didn't come with operating instructions. The tightening screw could benefit from fine threads, I think. The reed likes to slip around on the metal table. I don't know if I am over-tightening to compensate for the slippage.

There's been lots of talk about the new Link's being inconsistent and prone to being lemons. How am I supposed to know if I have a good one or not ? I did check the table by placing it on a flat steel surface and looking across the side in front of a light. There is a very slight concavity. I am told that it was designed this way but that the bad ones have to much. I think this one is OK because the reed seals without over-tightening the ligature. I got this Link from junkdude.com. Dave assured me that they visually inspect all MP's. He said that they sell a lot of the new Links and have very few returns.

Cheer, Dave
Can I ask how old you are and how long you have been playing?
 

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Also,......I went through a 10 year stage where I taught between 50-75 4th grade to 12th grade kids in private lessons every week. I started them all on Yamaha 4C mouthpieces. When it was time to upgrade mouthpieces I would let the tenor players try a variety of pieces from the local music store that I would borrow. In my experience 2 of 10 could jump to the 7* tip opening and did fine with that jump. These were usually my best students that put a ton of air through the horn and they were already wailing on the 4C and maxing it out volume wise. The other 8 who put medium air to low air through the horn no matter what I said about air, support and playing with volume could not make the jump to the 7*. Even after a week or two of trying on them, they just couldn't handle the amount of air needed at that point. The majority of those players ended up on a 6 tip opening. They sounded good and it felt comfortable to them. Comfortability is a huge factor for any student.

I personally have tried many mouthpieces at an 8* tip opening which isn't that much bigger than a 7* but I have felt uncomfortable on many of them. Some felt great to me but many more just felt uncomfortable for my tastes. It's just a personal choice and has to do with what you feel comfortable with. I love 7*'s but I have heard guys on 5*-7 who were killin'. I have also heard guys on 8*-10* that sounded killin'. I prefer my 7* but everyones different............
 
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