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Hey everyone, I've been on a saxophone playing hiatus for about 5 weeks now and I'm having a bit of an issue. Tomorrow I have a 2 hour long gig, but because I havent played so long I dont know if my embouchure will be able to last. I'm need in some advice on how to last the hours without having a complete embouchure failure, thanks in advance.
 

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I don't know what kind of stuff you are playing, or the context/venue, or what the rest of the band is, or how much endurance you had before the hiatus, so it is hard to give usable answers. If your embouchure was plenty strong before, you will likely be fine. If the context permits, you could take short(er) solos, let others take longer/more solos, maybe sit out a tune or two.
 

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Try to play as much as possible in the mid range, minimize upper range and altissimo, try to rest between songs or take a break in the set. Too late for this performance, sorry! Keep your chops up so it doesn’t happen again, force yourself to practice every day. How did it go for you?
 

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I'm in a similar situation and going to play a mini festival in Germany soon. I've had 3 weeks on vacation and my chops are flabby. As suggested softer reeds can help, but there is a tendency to tighten up too much when performing, so be careful and try to relax. I play nino down to tenor, so have a routine in playing the nino first until feeling like the chops are tired, then switch to the soprano, then alto, then tenor with each being a relaxation of the tighter embouchure. The reed strength is roughly the same for each (around 2 - 2 1/2). This means I can play for up to four hours with each step being a relaxation of the embouchure rather than fighting and tiring out. Don't know if this can work for you before or during performance. I can fortunately play whatever I want (instrument wise) so can also start with sopranino and switch around until just playing tenor. Of course if I haven't whacked my chops too much it's possible to switch back up to a higher pitch horn occasionally.
 
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