Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
7,474 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am seeking serious advice from working pros who play saxophone or wind controller in live situations using delay, chorus, harmonizer and looping effects through a (semi) portable keyboard or other amplifier for stage work.

I have been using an older KC-100/60 watt Roland keyboard amp and it has proven itself fine for smaller stages but I need something with a cleaner sound and more power for medium to larger auditorium situations.

Suggestions are welcome.

Thanks.

B:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
Wouldn't you use the halls sound system then?

I use a KC350 (I think that is the model). It's huge, but it is really..really loud. And has plenty of inputs and outputs
 

·
Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
7,474 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Wouldn't you use the halls sound system then?

I use a KC350 (I think that is the model). It's huge, but it is really..really loud. And has plenty of inputs and outputs
Generally speaking I would but some of the places we are playing on the road in-between do not have decent p.a.'s and we are playing live which means I can not hear much unless I TURN IT UP! B
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,526 Posts
I say go with a Powered Speaker + small mixer.

The Mackie SRM-450 is an all around great sounding speaker @ a reasonable price, and it's light to boot. I am not familiar with the 450 v2 but the original model is a beast & loud!!! You'll have plenty of headroom w/o any question. They are tough as nails and ready to pound night after night.

You should check these out. They really sound great.

http://www.mackie.com/products/srm450v2/
 

·
Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
7,474 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I already use a Mackie Mixer for some band eq and recording and did not think about a powered speaker hmmmm.......gonna check one out at my local Guitar Center.

Thanks. B
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
695 Posts
Don't want to hijack this thread but this question is somewhat related to the suggestions above.

What are the benefits of using a powered speaker vs powered amp with non-powered speaker which is what I use now in some situations? I can plug whatever gear I want into the powered amp and run to the house speaker and a monitor.
Thanks
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
6,086 Posts
The Roland AC 90 is portable and will pack a bit more punch than your current setup. I use an AC 60 though, and it is more than enough even on the occassions I play big stages. I do get my signal put through the monitors though in big rooms because the bandmates across the stage complain they can't hear me otherwise. Both the AC60 and AC90 have onboard reverb, delay, and chorus - two inputs (One XLR) and can be pole mounted. I keep mine at head height and less than 10 ft away and it's all I will ever need.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,526 Posts
Don't want to hijack this thread but this question is somewhat related to the suggestions above.

What are the benefits of using a powered speaker vs powered amp with non-powered speaker which is what I use now in some situations? I can plug whatever gear I want into the powered amp and run to the house speaker and a monitor.
Thanks
Portability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,526 Posts
I already use a Mackie Mixer for some band eq and recording and did not think about a powered speaker hmmmm.......gonna check one out at my local Guitar Center.

Thanks. B
No problem! :)

BTW, I am a keyboardist and have yet to meet a keyboard amp I like, Roland or otherwise. Most just won't cut it, especially when mega-high volume is concerned. I use a small PA with a sub and top w/ a QSC GX-5 power amp when I play keyboard gigs. I gave up on keyboard amps long ago...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,940 Posts
Given the new onslaught of Class D amps pumping out big watts with almost no weight, one should consider a new powered mixer and any good quality passive speaker. I just replaced my entire gig rig (with two amps, mixer, effects, compression, and eq) that weighed 120+ pounds and was the size of a small refrigerator with the new Mackie 8-channel 1,000 watt powered mixer that is the size of carry on luggage and weighs twenty pounds. Very inexpensive as well. With its onboard effects, compression, eq, direct boxes, and monitoring...it is a total solution for any application mentioned above.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
7,474 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Yofis I also went out yesterday and I think you may be right. These super small high power amplifiers are going to be the way I go. With a four piece band I need to mix and power so I am going to start looking for the best deal.

B
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
2,068 Posts
Seems like the Mackie powered mixer is a really good option.

I've been using a Roland KC-550, which is a 500 watt (I think), 3-channel keyboard amp with a 15" speaker and a tweeter. It sounds good, gets loud cleanly, but it's really not THAT loud. My favorite rig that I ever had was running my microphone into my pedal board (MXR Micro Amp, Boss Pitch Shifter, Boss DD-6 Delay, Ernie Ball volume pedal, sometimes an envelope filter) and then into a Peavey Classic 30 tube guitar amplifier, similar to a Fender Deluxe. The tube amp saturated the tone, but in a way I really liked, like an old ribbon mic or something... made the sound really gnarly and distinctive, perfect for the funky/electronic fusion stuff I do sometimes. That's kind of an unusual way to go, and it will NOT be for everybody, but it worked well for me, and I'm probably going to get another amp like that some day.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
4,901 Posts
If price isn't a factor, I'd go with the Bose L2 PAS System w/ the tonematch unit. I've been fortunate enough to have a friend who sells these units, so I get road test them from time to time. The major perks are;
-Compact System with huge sound
-Unit doubles as a monitor
-The sound is as clean as a studio recording. Very few PA speakers have this type of fidelity.
-The tonematch unit will supercharge any standard dynamic mic. The unit automatically sets a perfect EQ to match the voice (in this case saxophone) to the microphone being used.
-Feedback issues are greatly decreased due to the design of the unit.

The only downside I could see is that it ain't cheap. The Bose unit works extremely well with my Digitech pedal, and if price weren't a factor, I would own one of these myself.
 

·
Forum Contributor 2017
Joined
·
7,474 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top