Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys,
I took myself a little "homework" to do but I don't have much knowledge in transcribing scripts, what I'm trying to achieve here is to better understand a solo.
I know it shouldn't be a problem figuring it out by ear, I just want it written down not only for playing purposes but this is not a transcribing task nor the main goal.
I don't want to spend so long in this relatively simple task and I wonder if someone here will be kind and help me with it.
It's a short one chorus solo in the middle of Freddy King's "See see baby" song.
Here's the version I'm talking about https://youtu.be/Mo3ll90kggo
The solo starts at about 1:07

Anyone here willing to chip in?
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,546 Posts
Your benefit will be much greater if you do the transcription yourself---even if it is slow at first. At the end of the process you will not only have a transcribed solo, but you will have improved your "ear" and understanding of writing down rhythms. My advice:

- Download "Transcribe"
- Get several sheets of blank manuscript paper and several pencils with erasers.
- Start out with a measure at a time working toward doing a phrase at a time
- Slow the tempo as needed
- Either play what you hear on the sax and then write it down or use a keyboard

I like to put dots on the staff to represent the notes first and then go back and fill in the note values and rests after several measures. It helps me to separate the two at first. Some players prefer to learn and memorize a section of the solo by rote so they can play it on their instrument, and then write it down on the staff. Whatever method works best for you is the one to start with. If you would like to post your first attempt at transcription, I am sure there are members here who would be happy to review your work and offer a friendly critique along with suggested changes.

If you want to, you can ignore all of the above and hire some dude to write the transcription for you for about $1 a minute. All you will learn from that is how to pay some dude $1 a minute. ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,814 Posts
Hi guys,
I took myself a little "homework" to do but I don't have much knowledge in transcribing scripts, what I'm trying to achieve here is to better understand a solo.
I know it shouldn't be a problem figuring it out by ear, I just want it written down not only for playing purposes but this is not a transcribing task nor the main goal.
I don't want to spend so long in this relatively simple task and I wonder if someone here will be kind and help me with it.
It's a short one chorus solo in the middle of Freddy King's "See see baby" song.
Here's the version I'm talking about https://youtu.be/Mo3ll90kggo
The solo starts at about 1:07

Anyone here willing to chip in?
Thanks!
Some people are big on memorizing more than writing down. I'm in the writing down camp, simply because it will also help you incredibly with figuring out rhythms/time and in my opinion, will also make you a better reader.
You're already talking yourself out of it by saying you don't want to "spend so long" at it. Just park yourself in a chair with your mp3/cd, whatever player, your horn, a set of earphones and have at it. Assuming this is your first transcription, it'll probably take you longer than you want, but trust me, it'll be worth it. I'd also recommend you have another player play through it when your finished to make sure your rhythms are correct and readable. It's a learning curve for sure, but well worth it!

John
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,352 Posts
As you can see, we don't want to "spend so long" at it either. Take it as far as you can, and we would be glad to help if you get stuck in a few spots. The notes in this solo are very easy to pick out.

The hard part is going to be duplicating the effects he's doing, like the growls and false fingerings for that wah-wah effect. Trial and error is what you'll need for that, just closing the correct right hand keys to get the effect without changing the note.

For this particular solo, I think you're better off just playing along until you memorize it. I wouldn't bother writing it down unless you're wanting to do some harmonic analysis. But that's not really necessary on such a straight ahead solo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi guys,
Thanks for the suggestions.
This is not my first time transcribing but I'm not an expert in it, therefore I was hoping someone more fluent at that won't have to spend so long at it like me.
The purpose of this transcription is not learning to transcribe, it was meant more for the harmonic analysis and not just for being able to read and play along.
As for the growling and the false fingering, I've got it figured out already, before this solo.
I've already managed to get all the notes extracted by ear and with the help of MuseScore and placed them sequentially without exact tempo figures which is less important here.
What I'm trying to analyze here is for understanding how does this makes sense. I'm totally harmony theory illiterate, therefore I don't understand something.
The chords sequence for the guitar, in this solo is A# A# D#7 D#7 A# A# D#7 D#7 A# F D#7 A# (concert).
Based on the notes I extracted from the solo it seems he's using a Eb scale notes, but I was told this song is in A#, which if we transpose to tenor it makes it a plain C, and that's the exact note the solo starts and ends with.
When I tried just fiddling around the song using a plain pentatonic exercise in the C scale, it sounded off key at times, but then, if just playing as the guy in the solo, using Eb scale notes, it fits fine.
I'm trying to understand what I'm missing here...

Thanks,
 

·
Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
13,130 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,073 Posts
If your goal is to not spend much time on a transcription, you have to do a lot of it to train yourself to do it faster. Then it won’t take you much time. I also suggest to use “Transcribe!” to help train your ears and make some parts easier for you to hear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hearing Eb's and Bb's is probably what made you think it was the Eb scale.
Maybe, and also my lack of knowledge...
Thanks for clarifying things up a bit.
Still got a lot to learn...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,352 Posts
What Nefertiti said. If you want to think in terms of a pentatonic scale (in the T sax key), C min pentatonic (C-Eb-F-G-Bb) is a perfect fit and is identical to the C blues scale except the latter has one additional note (F#).

Another nice device you can use is emphasizing the Eb for a couple of bars, then resolve to the E natural near the end.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What Nefertiti said. If you want to think in terms of a pentatonic scale (in the T sax key), C min pentatonic (C-Eb-F-G-Bb) is a perfect fit and is identical to the C blues scale except the latter has one additional note (F#).

Another nice device you can use is emphasizing the Eb for a couple of bars, then resolve to the E natural near the end.
Sounds fine, and I actually did make use of some Eb intuitively...

But one question still remains, if I'm playing a tune in C maj, why then are you mentioning the use of C min pentatonic?
 

·
Moderator
Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
Joined
·
30,100 Posts
Sounds fine, and I actually did make use of some Eb intuitively...

But one question still remains, if I'm playing a tune in C maj, why then are you mentioning the use of C min pentatonic?
Blues often superimposes minor over major. (But not often 100% and not the other way round)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,352 Posts
Sounds fine, and I actually did make use of some Eb intuitively...

But one question still remains, if I'm playing a tune in C maj, why then are you mentioning the use of C min pentatonic?
What Pete said. It's also more useful to think of the key centers of the chord progression rather than the key of the tune. C7 has a Bb in it, and F7 has an Eb in it. Eb is also a "blue" note in a C blues. None of those notes are in C major, but they fit the individual chords and the blues.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top