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Discussion Starter #1
i'm writing a tune and want this chord(from bottom up):

Ab Eb Bb Db F


i could just say Bb-/Ab but the Eb is so absolutely necessary to making this chord work correctly, and that symbol doesn't have to have that Eb..so i need one that would include all these notes...guess i could just explain it to whomever i play with...

any suggestions?
 

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dpmusic said:
Ab Eb Bb Db F


If the Ab is the root (is it ???),

then could be Ab13, except 3rd and 7th missing
(which are important to 13th, otherwise won't sound like 13th.
Must have 7th/3rd/13th minimum to have 13th sound).

So maybe a sus chord with added 9 and 13.
(if Gb in there then could be 11th instead of sus)

Maybe root is Db. Often chords can have 5th in bass.

hgiles might be able to help. He's got a piano.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
yes Ab is the root.
i was thinking i could name it Bb-7add11/Ab

that has all the notes in it...but doesn't imply the voicing i want..i'm not sure if there is a way to do that merely with chord symbols. :(


thanks for the input.
wish there was more talking about theory round these parts...
 

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Ab sus ( R 5 9 11 13 )
or Eb-9 with Ab in the bass ( Eb-9/Ab ) .
Either way - functionally the same.
II chord in the key of Db with Ab ( V ) in the root
Or V sus4 in Db
Adding Gb fits with either.
As 3rd or 7th depending if you are calling it a II7 or Vsus chord.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
well, i can't call it Eb-9/Ab because i don't want a Gb in the chord, it hints too much at being a dominant chord that way..and it definitely isn't..it "functions" this way:

E9 F#9 (chord we're talking about here)
E9 F#9 C#majadd9/G#

it's really just a repeating phrase..i wanted a different configuration of the C# chord at the end of the first line that hints at where it will resolve but it delays the resolution until the C#.

anyway i guess it's pretty common to add the 13 to sus chords, so Ab sus would work. i'll prolly use that...
 

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I wouldn't try putting a symbol with it. If you analyze the pitch classes you've got: F-Bb-Eb-Ab-Db. A series of perfect fourths, it has about the same vagueness as the chromatic scale and/or the whole tone scale. There really isn't a lot of definition to the sound.

If you can give us the key that it operates in and the sequence of chords that come before it and after it, also the style of music we might be able to give you a symbol that approximates the sound. But in situations such as these, if you want a specific voicing, you are going to have to tell your accompanists what you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
there is no key. and the chords i mentioned in my last post are all the chords that make up this section of the tune. the sections before and after what i wrote in my last post are just C#-7 and G-7.
you're right about the vagueness of the chord in question...that's the appeal of it definitely. i'm pretty sure about the Absus being the right way to do it...i need a pianists input on whether or not the 13 is an expected note to have in a sus voicing...i could just add it to the chord....

Absusadd13

perfect.
 

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Ab6(sus4). If you add a Gb, it becomes Ab13(sus4), which it sounds like anyway because the F is on top.

(BTW, I am primarily a pianist with lots of big band chart experience. If you want me to play the notes exactly as you specified them, you should spell them out in notation on the staves. The chord symbol is only a suggestion. If you make it a 13, I am probably going to play the Ab.)
 
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