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Discussion Starter #1
I have a soprano that only like short mouthpieces (tuning issues). I cannot find a lot of lengths listed. If anyone has a minute could you measure some of your popular mouthpiece lengths (in inches please) Here are just a few off the top of my head but if It plays well and its short I d like to know so I don't order any longer pieces I am stuck with... I would really appreciate it
1. V16 HR
2. V5
3. Otto Link HR
4. Otto Link STM
5. Dukoff
6 Yanagisawa
7 Selmer
8. Claude Lackey
 

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Many short mouthpiece designs have larger chamber volumes. So a short mouthpiece may not get you what you think you need.

When you play the mouthpiece off the sax with your normal embouchure, what note does it sound? If it is much lower than a C or Db, then you may want to explore using more embouchure support and retune by pulling out some. Shortening mouthpieces is fair game but you may not need it.
 

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A vintage Buescher is 2.4” long (with a large chamber). A Selmer Super Session about 2.6”. A Bari brand 2.65”. Most others I have measured are in the 2.7-2.8” range. I have shotened some to 2.25” for players.
 

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and . . . another thing to consider is the internal length of the mouthpiece where the neck is inserted. Some are shorter inside than others. It won't matter about the overall external length if the internal length isn't sufficient. DAVE
 

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Yes to both...I spoke a little quick (it was morning lol)

Most guys who need sop pieces shortened is due to the construction of early sop pieces.

If you are playing a modern sop those pieces should not be too long so it may be wise to check your approach.

I have had one customer who could not get a sop piece I rebuilt for him to work on his horn because the interior pea shooter chamber was too close to the end...the neck jammed into it and that was the end of that...no addressing that issue.

...but if you have an old sop and the shank gets in the way of mechanisms you can have them shortened.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you for the replies and Thank you Mojo for taking the time to measure a few MP's.
Basically I have a Yamaha Mp that is 2 5/8" long and it plays in tune but I also have a longer piece (Rico) that is just under 3" and it will not even come close to proper tuning and no amount of embouchure support will get it there. Basically I want to know the lengths of some popular "quality" soprano Mp so I don't get stuck returning them ect... I wish manufactures would put up more specs.
 

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Thank you for the replies and Thank you Mojo for taking the time to measure a few MP's.
Basically I have a Yamaha Mp that is 2 5/8" long and it plays in tune but I also have a longer piece (Rico) that is just under 3" and it will not even come close to proper tuning and no amount of embouchure support will get it there. Basically I want to know the lengths of some popular "quality" soprano Mp so I don't get stuck returning them ect... I wish manufactures would put up more specs.
The experts here are trying to tell you that overall length alone doesn't tell you anything. A "long" mouthpiece may play very well in tune... if it has the right (smaller/narrower) interior geometry (cross-sectional area in the chamber/throat, as well as chamber shape).
 

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I would say that if the Selmer is an S80 or S90, and plays flat, you may indeed want to stay away from pieces of that length... because those are quite small in cross-sectional area, as are the Link brass pieces (which you call an STM but the mfr. does not).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The experts here are trying to tell you that overall length alone doesn't tell you anything. A "long" mouthpiece may play very well in tune... if it has the right (smaller/narrower) interior geometry (cross-sectional area in the chamber/throat, as well as chamber shape).
This was already stated by the experts above so I am not sure why you are reposting it again. It was not lost on me...
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I would say that if the Selmer is an S80 or S90, and plays flat, you may indeed want to stay away from pieces of that length... because those are quite small in cross-sectional area, as are the Link brass pieces (which you call an STM but the mfr. does not).
Not sure where your getting "Selmer" from as I have only tried 2 mouthpieces on the horn one was a Yamaha and the Other a Rico. Both look very similar chamber wise but the Rico is considerably longer and is problematic.
 

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Bob: Before you get too salty with forum members trying to help, you, you should be more detailed in describing the exact issue. For instance, you made no mention of the neck-cork's role. Sometimes players don't even think that the thickness of the neck-cork may be the sole factor as to why the piece won't shove on far enough to come to pitch. Merely taking some sandpaper to the lower part of the neck-cork (thereby reducing the cork's outer diameter) will allow the piece to go further in the neck.

There are usually two (maybe three if you count poor manufacturing) issues as to why a saxophone won't tune properly . . . the mouthpiece can't shove on far enough or 2) the internal volume of the mouthpiece (chamber-size) is insufficient. I'm leaving out the player's embouchure here.

You didn't say what kind of soprano is involved. From my own experiences, I know that some of my soprano mouthpieces need to shove on so far to come to pitch that the bottom of the barrel blocked the upper octave pad from moving. I had to have two Selmer S-80's, two Morgan Vintage, and metal Link pieces shortened so they wouldn't interfere with the upper octave vent. This was on TT sopranos . . . my vintage Conn and Martin are not affected by that issue, nor are my MKVI's and Yanagisawas.

Speaking of Selmer, Shlockrod mentioned it because YOU mentioned it. The S-80's are long mouthpieces.

I have a Runyon that is so short inside that the neck bottoms out before any of my sopranos come to pitch. That issue is probably unfixable with reaming out the inside of the barrel - and I'm not interested in fixing that issue anyway. If this thread goes on, I think you should be more detailed in your description of the problem because there are many factors at work. DAVE
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Bob: Before you get too salty with forum members trying to help, you, you should be more detailed in describing the exact issue. For instance, you made no mention of the neck-cork's role. Sometimes players don't even think that the thickness of the neck-cork may be the sole factor as to why the piece won't shove on far enough to come to pitch. Merely taking some sandpaper to the lower part of the neck-cork (thereby reducing the cork's outer diameter) will allow the piece to go further in the neck.

There are usually two (maybe three if you count poor manufacturing) issues as to why a saxophone won't tune properly . . . the mouthpiece can't shove on far enough or 2) the internal volume of the mouthpiece (chamber-size) is insufficient. I'm leaving out the player's embouchure here.

You didn't say what kind of soprano is involved. From my own experiences, I know that some of my soprano mouthpieces need to shove on so far to come to pitch that the bottom of the barrel blocked the upper octave pad from moving. I had to have two Selmer S-80's, two Morgan Vintage, and metal Link pieces shortened so they wouldn't interfere with the upper octave vent. This was on TT sopranos . . . my vintage Conn and Martin are not affected by that issue, nor are my MKVI's and Yanagisawas.

Speaking of Selmer, Shlockrod mentioned it because YOU mentioned it. The S-80's are long mouthpieces.

I have a Runyon that is so short inside that the neck bottoms out before any of my sopranos come to pitch. That issue is probably unfixable with reaming out the inside of the barrel - and I'm not interested in fixing that issue anyway. If this thread goes on, I think you should be more detailed in your description of the problem because there are many factors at work. DAVE
Salty lol. If repeating previous posters in order to act like a big shot is helpful that is news to me.
As for the "Selmer" I also mentioned 7 other mouthpieces that I don't own, obviously have not tried and won't purchase if I aquire the pertient information. This would be clear to someone who took the time to read the OP but there always seems to be one in the thread.
I do appreciate the folks who were truly here to be helpful.
 

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I also have a longer piece (Rico) that is just under 3" and it will not even come close to proper tuning and no amount of embouchure support will get it there.
Please excuse me for not reading the whole thread but I noticed this comment about the Rico. IME, the Rico Graftonite and Metalite mouthpieces are just too frickin' long, especially for vintage sopranos. I have used several (many?) of these for refacing experiments and the first thing I do is chop 1cm off the shank. I also grind quite a bit from inside the chamber to keep it from butting into the end of the horn's neck. These suckers may work on some modern sopranos, but for me, they don't work with vintage sopranos without significant mods.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thank you Jorns.
That mod is a good start!
Mine is not a vintage soprano but a newer Asian. I want to get some better Mp's but don't want to have to chop them up as well.
 

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Manners go a long way on this forum....salty isnt the word, rude, curt and insulting is more accurate. You ask a question and people try to help. You dont explain the problem clearly and then you call insult others. Please dont call me for a mouthpiece.
 

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BARI can be a good affordable option. Yanagisawas have a similar chambers, but are longer. I've cut back the shanks but would prefer to start with a BARI.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
BARI can be a good affordable option. Yanagisawas have a similar chambers, but are longer. I've cut back the shanks but would prefer to start with a BARI.
Thanks for the info Tocchiuto and your thoughtful reply.
Bari is one I didn't think of for the above list but they do seem to appear on the shorter side.
 
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