Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,506 Posts
doriz: I taught myself chords by buying a piano chord book that showed all of the chords (well, almost all - I suppose there may be some out-of-the-box chords not shown) and playing them on a piano, then playing the same arpeggios on saxophone. Part of it was having a good ear for melody and harmony.

Once you become familiar with HEARING a chord and being able to identify it by its sound, then when improvising a tune, you can pick harmony notes and arpeggios to fit a tune's chord-pattern. I don't think improvising is a technique that is easily taught.

Try playing a simple melody on your clarinet, then finding the harmony notes, and try straying from the melody to add transitional notes and other fills to enhance the simple melody.

There is a huge discussion of ligatures in the LIGATURE section. To briefly answer your lig question, yes, a BG should work on those mouthpieces. My choice would be the stock Selmer metal two-screw ligature. DAVE
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,506 Posts
I don't think one needs to PLAY the piano to sit down and sound out chords. I don't play piano but I can sound out all the chords on the keyboard so I can 1) hear them, and 2) see how they are constructed. Then, it is relatively simple for me to translate the sound and the structure on my saxophones/clarinets.

Before complicating the process by thinking of all the things you listed, just play simple melodies and find the harmonies, hearing them in your head. Then, play some grace-notes into the coming melody notes, follow a phrase with a chord extension (arpeggio), play unwritten variations on the melodies, etc.

Keep your weapon clean! DAVE
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top