Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've been playing alto for about six years now, and i need help on deciding which mouthpice i should get. I was thinking about getting a JodyJazz classic or go with a Meyer. I need help
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,212 Posts
I'm going to tell you what everyone else is. Try them and see which ones you like! Try as many as possible. It's also hard for people to give decent advice unless you say what your sound concept is and what you (dis)like about your current mouthpiece.
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,871 Posts
I've been playing alto for about six years now, and i need help on deciding which mouthpice i should get.
Surely, if you've been playing for six years, you must already have a mouthpiece? :dontknow:
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,871 Posts
what are you playing now?
And what do you find wrong with it exactly. That's the reason for my facetious comment above and the only way for us to be able to help seriously.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I'm a junior in high school, Im currently playing on a selmer 3c. My section leader got a JodyJazz mouthpiece and i was thinking i should upgrade my mouthpiece, but don't know which mouthpiece to go to
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,871 Posts
If you know of what's wrong with your Selmer, then the best thing is to let us know what that is, and what you are looking for to improve matters. I always think that when you know what is wrong, what can be improved and how, then that is the time to upgrade. Meanwhile there is nothing wrong with trying out out different mouthpieces, though if you are at an early stage of learning I think it's always best to discuss with your teacher before making any radical changes.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
6,831 Posts
The Selmer piece does lack volume, and is quite 2 dimensional in tone. If your section leader has a JodyJazz HR piece, than a Meyer (or Meyer-like) piece should be what you're after. The point of a band is to blend. The point of a lead alto is to blend and lead the band, but have a enough "cut" to cut through during solos and trumpet/sax soli sections.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Nothing is wrong with my old mouthpiece, I just feel like its time to upgrade to a better one. I play concert, marching and jazz music
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
761 Posts
If you get a jazz mouthpiece, DO NOT use it in concert band. Your band director would likely hate you if you used it in concert band.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,525 Posts
If you get a jazz mouthpiece, DO NOT use it in concert band. Your band director would likely hate you if you used it in concert band.
It really depends on the mouthpiece. If you get a mouthpiece at the extreme end of the spectrum, perhaps something with a large baffle, I would agree that it might not work in concert band. But I used Meyer mouthpieces during High School, and used them not just in Jazz band but also in concert band and for Region and All State auditions for concert band. And these days I use my RPC not just for rock and roll and jazz, but also when I play a ballad in church where I need to get really soft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
What kind of meyer mouthpieces are there, I tried looking them up and the only one I find is the Meyer G series mouthpiece
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
492 Posts
I believe there are about 4 popular one that you can find in most stores, 3 hard rubber models and a metal. There's the standard HR Jazz piece, the HR G series which you mentioned above, and the HR Richie Cole model. Then there's the Metal Jazz Piece for the alto. Not sure if it's just a metal version of the standard HR Jazz piece,... hope someone can clarify on that because I've heard both that it is and it isn't. There may be other Meyer options for the alto, but I know these four exist.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
3,875 Posts
With a JodyJazz piece, you know it's be hand finished and that the rails and tip will be even. If you buy a stock Meyer, there's no such guarantee. There are good stock Meyer's and there are bad ones. If you can't try them in person, ordering them online could be iffy because you don't know what you're going to get.

Doron makes a good point. What you'll find is that a lot of the greats like Cannonball Adderley and Phil Woods played on Meyer's. Unfortunately, the current ones aren't like the old ones. That's why there are many "Meyer-ish" pieces on the market and players try them and find what works for them.

I haven't tried a JJ Classic but I've played the JodyJazz HR* which is their Meyer-ish piece. It's a very good piece. It wasn't for me but it was well made and had a solid tone and though it's not as cheap as a stock Meyer, it's cheaper than a lot of alternatives.

You can also get a refaced Meyer. Our own Sigmund451 is a great refacer and offers a refaced Meyer on his site ( http://www.phil-tone.com ). I've tried a refaced modern Meyer from a different refacer and didn't like it much. I haven't tried Phil's though. I have tried his own "Meyer-ish" piece now known as "The Aurora" which I thought was excellent. I liked it a lot more than the Jody Jazz.

Another option is the Vandoren V16 mouthpieces. Quite a few notable players on both alto and tenor play these.They're consistent, and they're not very expensive (comparatively).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,525 Posts
Here is a link that shows an online seller offering the "standard" modern Meyer hard rubber alto sax mouthpiece. The Meyer 5M (5 Medium) is the typical tip opening that people start with, if they go with a Meyer:
http://www.wwbw.com/Meyer-Hard-Rubber-Alto-Saxophone-Mouthpiece-472750-i1418045.wwbw

If there is a musical instrument store nearby which sells sax mouthpieces, the hard rubber Meyer 5M is one of the types they are most likely to have in stock. Your best bet would be to find someplace that has this and some other models in stock which you would be able to try playing on your own sax before you buy one.

P.S.
One thing to keep in mind is that the tip opening numbers for the older "New York" Meyer hard rubber mouthpieces which were used by some of the alto sax greats do not correspond to the tip opening numbers used with modern Meyer mouthpieces. I read once that an old New York Meyer 5M has a tip opening similar to a modern Meyer 7M - this might not be exactly accurate, but you get the idea. The New York Meyer mouthpieces have not been made for a long time, and on the used market they tend to be incredibly expensive.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top