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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I just bought a refurbished Kenny G "G Series" soprano, and it doesn't include a mouthpiece (I knew this before buying. It was a really good deal). The original Kenny G soprano saxophones require a "short shank" mouthpiece, so I'm a little unsure of what will fit. Will a Selmer S80 work, or do I need something else? And if I do need something else, what are my options?

Thanks!!
 

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get s selmer super session to be on the safe side. shank is short so chances are it will work just fine on most any soprano
 

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I play a vandoren V16 S6 mouthpiece which I like a lot. Superb sound. It has a square chamber, so I guess its a selmer soloist clone (??). I wouldn't know if it would fit your soprano though!

Kulos
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info so far. The Selmer Super Session is described as "high level professional", so does this mean it would be more difficult to play? I haven't yet played a soprano, so is it possible to learn on a mouthpiece like that?

I've also looked at the Vandoren. It appears the shank and overall dimensions are similar to the S80 and most of the standard sized mouthpieces, so that still leaves the original question of if the standard size mouthpiece will fit on my saxophone?

If it helps at all, here's a page showing the difference between the "G Series" (middle) and the more standard "G Series II": http://www.kennygsaxophones.com/kgss_g_series_development.html The main difference seems to be that the original "G Series" is slightly longer at the bore.
 

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I like the Super Session but it does take some chops compared to the Vandoren, also good. I sold both my Vandoren and SS and now use a Yamaha 4C...yes a cheap under $20 mouthpiece. These are great and as far as short shank, most any soprano mouthpiece should work. If it is too long and hits the octave key, it can be cut down but I doubt that is needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the help everyone. If the Yamaha and others should fit, I guess "long shank" refers to some of the more special mouthpieces like the Dukoff. Since the Yamaha is 1/5 the cost of the others and seems to be a good starter piece, I think I'll go ahead with that one first and move up later if I feel like it.

Thanks again!
 

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Even if you move to a more expensive mouthpiece later, you can keep the Yamaha for an extra as you won't have a fortune in it.
 

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Another piece that should fit is the Runyon Custom. You can get that with, or without a "spoiler" that brightens the sound a little. It is not expensive - about $60. But I think the Yamaha 4C should be your first piece. The main thing for a beginner is to be able to play all the notes on the horn and to play them with reasonable intonation. The Yamaha 4C will do that. The tip opening is the thing to watch when starting out. The 4C is a "closed" mouthpiece at 0.047" while the Selmer Super Session has openings starting at 0.053" for an E and going up to 0.070" for a J. The bigger the opening the harder you have to work to get a sound. With a 4C it should be easy to get a sound without much effort. I have played Selmers E and F (.057), G (0.060), I (.065) and a Runyon 6 (.055). But now my favorite is the Yamaha 5C (.050). You should also try a soft reed of 2.0 or 2.5 strength. This helps you get control of your tone. Then Practice, practice, practice ....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the further information. I've also been using a 4C on my alto (Etude EAS-100, very nice instrument for what you pay), and liked it the moment I got it. I've ordered the soprano 4C, and I'm hoping I'll like it just as much. I've also ordered a Fibracell strength 2 synthetic reed since it seems to be well liked, and a Rovner Dark ligature. I decided to get a synthetic from the beginning on this one, because I like playing my Carbon Fiberreed a lot more than cane reeds on my alto. If any of that gives me trouble, I'll look for something a little more basic.
 

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.....while the Selmer Super Session has openings starting at 0.053" for an E and going up to 0.070" for a J. The bigger the opening the harder you have to work to get a sound
There are 2 things here that are just not true: first, no matter what Selmer (or almost anybody else) says about their tip openings, the reality is they can be anything regardless of the labeling. Let's be sure that players just starting out know what the rest of us already know about that issue.

Second- it's just not true that bigger tip openings on a soprano piece mean a player has to work harder to get a sound.

Moderation, when beginning, is a good thing, of course. But there is nothing that makes a larger tipped soprano piece inherently more work to play or harder to get a sound. The same thing can be said about a very closed mouthpiece, when coupled with the wrong reeds or facing. But I never see that mentioned.

I put these claims in the same bag as "the soprano is a beast to play". Nonsense.
 

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I recently purchased a super session from Joe and it has a larger tip opening than I have played before but it is a real dream to play.
It is real shame that mouthpieces dont play like this of the shelf as I have a few that are just real duds and the piece Joe worked on just sings.
 

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I just repaired a Woodwind France B6 mouthpiece that was dog chewed. It looked like a newer one. It has .058" tip with a fairly resistant facing curve. It was a nice squeaze throat design. It felt real comfortable and compared well to my .065" Vand S25 that has a lower resitant curve on it. I could use similar reeds on both mouthpieces. The WW had better altissimo, not that that is real imporatnt to me on sop sax. I had to send the mouthpiece back to the client, but it did turn my head!
 

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+1 on Joe's mouthpieces .... a good soprano mouthpiece is a collection of little things done well
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I got the new mouthpiece today, along with the synthetic reed and ligature. With the mouthpiece pressed on all the way, I'm getting flat by about 2 to 4hz on most notes. Of course, this is the first time I've ever played a soprano, and I've only been on alto for just over a year. I still haven't gotten the tuning in my playing quite right yet. Other than the slight flatness, the mouthepiece combination with the Kenny G soprano plays absolutely great! The response is very quick, and the playability actually seems easier than my alto saxophone (which now has a Selmer S80C*)!:mrgreen: I think I'll be having some fun with this.:mrgreen:
 

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Here we go again: at this point in soprano mpc threads I jump in and say "You really should try a Bari HR."

So--I think you really should try a Bari HR for soprano. Best value for the money.
 

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Is this intonation by oscilloscope ????? 2-4 hz relative to what[rolleyes]]

Bari MPC hmmmmmm ........ too bad there wasn't a Bass brand.... easier to fit the sax in
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hertz is a universal measurement for all frequencies, including sound. The tuner I used measures in "CENT" (?) and "Hz". It showed my playing at about 2 to 4 Hertz below perfect pitch, or about -10 to -20 CENT.
 

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Most tuners are only accurate to about 1%. One exception I know of are the Peterson Strobe Tuners which are accurate to .1 cent. Many tuners are sold as guitar tuners and are sweetened for guitar. If your tuner is based on E as opposed to A 440 and while still in range of accuracy as sold it is quite possible to be out of tune. If me memory is still working (which is an issue at my age) 1 cent = semitone/100.

If you are playing with a piano your tuner may or may not be in tune. Peterson strobe tuners (and possibly other high end tuners that I am not familiar with) can be set to the different temperments and sweeteners at your option.
 

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The Runyon Custom with no spoiler is a great mouthpiece for soprano. It seems to have a short lay which improves the tuning stability. I have used a #8 for about 15 years, a red color, and it was inexpensive. Air support is always the key to the saxophone!!
 
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